Too rough with children

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Postby babaes » September 8th, 2006, 1:10 pm

Hi I am a new dog owner. My puppy is now 5 months old. She is very smart. She has learned everything soo easily, its amazing. My one problem with her is she is really rough with little children (toddlers). She is good with older children that can talk. I do not know how to teach her to be gentle. I just started dog school yesterday so I am hoping that will help. Can anyone tell me how to get her to leave toddlers alone? or atleast be gentle. Its like she gets even more excited around little kids and ends up scaring them cause she is just too much up in there face, she is also like this with dogs. they get quite annoyed of her and it sometimes almost turns into a fight.
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Postby mnp13 » September 8th, 2006, 1:13 pm

babaes wrote:they get quite annoyed of her and it sometimes almost turns into a fight.


What do you mean by that?

Put her in a down and park her there until they have left, or crate her. She is too young to have the level of self control needed to be safe around kids. Not that she will hurt them intentionally but it takes work to make the dog understand to be gentle.

Connor and Riggs are not allowed around kids without strict supervision because they are just too energetic and rambunctious. they have flattened my neices more than once because they just don't know better. Ruby is fine, and my sister wants her to babysit. lol
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Postby babaes » September 8th, 2006, 1:25 pm

babaes wrote:
they get quite annoyed of her and it sometimes almost turns into a fight.


What do you mean by that?

Well she LOVES other dogs and will play and play (too rough usually) and when the other dog/dogs get tired they will give her a growl to stop and she just keeps going and usually ends up the older dog getting mad and then she gets defencive back (she doesnt seem to care if the dog is bigger she is not at all scared) and then they will start to almost fight. and then I run in and split it up.
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Postby DemoDick » September 8th, 2006, 1:28 pm

One side of the dogs and kids equation often gets forgotten. Sure, the dog should know how to act around the child but just as importantly the kids should know how to act around the dog.

Communicating with kids is a lot easier than communicating with dogs. We speak the same language. We can tell them things like "Puppy doesn't need a rectal exam with a screwdriver" or "Crayons don't go in puppy's ear holes." If a child knows what is acceptable and what is not, then it's a lot easier to keep both the dog and the child safe.

Just make sure to supervise any interaction, even after both the dog and the child know the rules.

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Postby mnp13 » September 8th, 2006, 1:30 pm

babaes wrote:Well she LOVES other dogs and will play and play (too rough usually) and when the other dog/dogs get tired they will give her a growl to stop and she just keeps going and usually ends up the older dog getting mad and then she gets defencive back (she doesnt seem to care if the dog is bigger she is not at all scared) and then they will start to almost fight. and then I run in and split it up.


You need to break it up LONG before that point. Ideally before the other dog's warning growl. Eventually a dog will decide to teach her a lesson and you're in for a world of trouble (and vet bills).

You need to teach her to control herself before she is allowed to be around other dogs.
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Postby babaes » September 8th, 2006, 3:10 pm

Thanks!!!
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Postby lellis34 » September 8th, 2006, 5:03 pm

King was very excited around children too - still is some times but it's more controlled now. I have family day care centers on either side of my house so there's a lot of kids around. And, now that he's had some training, the kids always run up to us when they see us come outside. They just love him - and he's just as big as some of them.

He's always leashed and on a close lead so I can control him better. Whenever the kids start to approach he goes into a sit position. He does it now without command, but I used to have to give him the command - sometimes several times because he would get back up. I always tell the kids when they approach, to make sure they put their hand out palm side up so he can sniff it. They tend to want to reach to pet the top of the head and a hand coming over the head can be intimidating to a dog sometimes. It's a good opportunity to teach them a little too. If they're too excited I tell them before they get too close that they need to be calm when they approach any dog and always ask to pet first before they do. Once they greet each other then he's been pretty good. Don't get me wrong, he still gets over eager sometimes, but he is ALWAYS LEASHED around kids.

If you know some older kids who aren't timid around dogs, you could use them as bait...I mean training aides. :D Since you've just started in doggie school, talk to your trainer and wait until she's mastered the sit and/or down position on command. And always make sure she's right next to you on a short leash.
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Postby babaes » September 8th, 2006, 5:16 pm

Well she is more problematic when the kids are still toddlers. When they can talk it doesnt seem to be a problem cause I can then communicate with both the dog and the kid. She is really bad when the toddler or baby cries. then she gets even more excited.
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Postby pibblegrl » September 9th, 2006, 12:26 am

Another thing to keep in mind as you are teaching her to control herself..
Like the others said keep her leashed..and when she starts acting up-remove her from the situation and pey her no attention until she has calmed herself...ONLY pet her when she is exhibiting the proper behavior (ie: calm, quiet-watching the kids and not acting like a butt)..it'll take time...
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Postby rockermom » September 9th, 2006, 8:20 am

when children or visitors come to your home keep her on leash. attatch it to your pants if you have too. As a matter of fact yesterday I brought my dog Rocky to a soccer game. It was the first time he saw a todler. This baby was about 14 months and was toddling around with his dad. Rocky looked over at him with a look of ohh what is that. Im not sure what he may of done if not on leash. But the curious look on him im sure he would have run right up and knocked that baby down for sure. ANd take his cookies or lick the milk off his face or who knows. I have older children 11 and 16 and could not imagine having a puppy and a toddler what work that would be.
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Postby Romanwild » September 9th, 2006, 10:17 am

After meeting Gary Wilkes at the Bull-ympics last weekend he clarified a lot to me about teaching inhibitions.

I'm not going to recite what he taught me but reading this might help you a bit.

http://clickandtreat.com/Clicker_Traini ... /gg011.htm
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Postby Hoyden » September 9th, 2006, 11:03 am

I would suggest keeping the dog on a leash at all times around smaller children. And teach your dog that when children approach to sit down.

Our Petey is great witg children because if they're order, he sits, if they're small, he goes into a down. Petey is the personification of why the English refer to Stafforshire Terriers as the nursemaid's dog.

I remove the dogs from the room or crate them if they do not settle down commanded to.
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Postby Samthepit » September 11th, 2006, 9:05 am

I'm so glad this thread was started because we've been struggling w/ Sam in regards to kids. She's NEVER been aggressive towards my kids (otherwise she would NOT be here) but it was nice to read the solutions here ie making her stay in a sit/down/stay position anytime kids approach her. I'll start working on that....

However she did act really weird today when I took her along for a ride to take my oldest to school. She went absolutly nuts when she saw the kids. Problem is I don't know 'why' she went nuts when she saw the kids. She sounded like cujo even when my oldest opened the door back up to put something back in the van that fell out. I had a hold of her collar but I thought - what would she have done if I hadn't been holding her?! She's never done that before and truth be told I was rather pissed that she acted that way. I will be seeing Cheryl Carlson soon for an evaluation and go from there - in the meantime I'm wondering if my dog just gets really excited when she see's kids or if she really wants to eat them. Some days I just don't know what I've gotten myself into.... :cry:
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Postby mnp13 » September 11th, 2006, 11:04 am

You're going to go see Cheryl??!?! YAY!!!!

Please please please don't forget to say "Hi" from us!

Huge numbers of kids with backpacks, hats, all the movement and excitement... I'm sure that had something to do with her actions. Also, cars bring out barrier frusteration.
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Postby babaes » September 11th, 2006, 12:02 pm

[quote="[url=http://www.pitbulltalk.com//viewtopic.php?p=79848#79848]

Huge numbers of kids with backpacks, hats, all the movement and excitement... I'm sure that had something to do with her actions. Also, cars bring out barrier frusteration.[/quote]

Interesting to know cause my dog seems to growl at EVERYTHING in the car.
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Postby Samthepit » September 11th, 2006, 12:10 pm

On September 11 2006, mnp13 wrote:You're going to go see Cheryl??!?! YAY!!!!

Please please please don't forget to say "Hi" from us!

Huge numbers of kids with backpacks, hats, all the movement and excitement... I'm sure that had something to do with her actions. Also, cars bring out barrier frusteration.


Yes I just got my response from her and providing I can get someone to watch my kids I'll be heading out that way thursday afternoon.... I'm so excited as I've been wanting to have Sam evaluated for a long time now. She'll evaluate her first then I'm going to talk to her about the need (if there is one) for a home visit. Her price's weren't bad either - especially for someone w/ what appears to be a glowing reputation... I'll keep you updated...
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