Excessive Barking..

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Postby anissa » July 23rd, 2006, 1:05 pm

Jaida is EXTREMELY vocal, I was told so before we decided to adopt her, and although its not a problem for us yet, it may easily become one in the future.

When her and Charlie first met, she was pretty excited, growled and barked when she wanted to play, but since they've gotten used to each other.. she's really calmed down and they play quietly in the house.

When we put her outback or take her on a walk/run, she gets sooo excited that its almost impossible to get her to stop barking. We have neighbors with dogs, and she'll bark at them non-stop until we bring her in.. if she hears the slightest noise outside, she'll bark excessively until we can bribe her with a treat or something to be quiet.

I am more worried about her barking in the yard and out in public. If I was someone else and didnt know better.. I would be terrified. She has a very loud and strong bark, that mixed with her excitement and drive to jump up on everyone.. is enough to make anyone affraid that she's going to attack.

We start obedience classes on the 1st but Im worried about how she'll act around the other owners/dogs. I really need to start working on quieting her barks, and calming her down. How do I do this?

I realize we've just gotten her and she's probably still excited and unsure of whats going on around her, but I want to start working on these problems as soon as we can.
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » July 23rd, 2006, 1:58 pm

I have read that the easiest way to get them to STOP barking is to teach them to do so on command. That way you can start them and stop them on command. :| Don't know if that'll work - she is pretty loud!
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Postby anissa » July 23rd, 2006, 9:48 pm

I dont know if that method will work with her Liz. I can always try it though.

Im surprised more people havent responded, come on!! I need your advice! :P
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » July 23rd, 2006, 10:05 pm

Starting your obedience classes should help as well. The trainer will have ways to distract her and get her attention back on you. You might want to try teaching "watch me" - then when she starts barking get her focused back on you. And maybe a can with coins in it? Some people swear by those here. I'm also surprised nobody else has responded!
I'll also see if Shana has some ideas.
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Postby Romanwild » July 23rd, 2006, 10:06 pm

Liz is right. You can do it with marker training. I use the word "No" then I use the negative reinforcer(?). In my case I use a squirt bottle, prong collar, leash pop and recently tried a RTC (remote training collar). I mark the unwanted behavior with the marker "NO" wait 1-2 seconds then deliver the NR with the appropriate intensity.

Dreyfus is my barker and he stops when I tell him to. :|

I'm sure you keep an eye on your dogs when they're tied out but I just have to put in my :twocents: .

I never leave my dogs on a tether unattended, ever. I'm extra paronoid, sure. But it only takes a second for something to happen.

I'm done with my :twocents:. :D

Who's your trainer?
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Postby katiek0417 » July 23rd, 2006, 10:20 pm

Romanwild wrote:I use the word "No" then I use the negative reinforcer(?). In my case I use a squirt bottle, prong collar, leash pop and recently tried a RTC (remote training collar). I mark the unwanted behavior with the marker "NO" wait 1-2 seconds then deliver the NR with the appropriate intensity.



Positive punisher (the giving of something bad - a correction - in order to decrease the likelihood of a behavior). All of those are forms of positive punishment.

(Neg. reinf is the taking away of something bad in order to increase behavior).

Sorry...going through this on another board....
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Postby Picturesque » July 23rd, 2006, 10:39 pm

It seems that she is very reactive and the only way she knows how to cope is through vocalization. I will respond tomorrow with some things that you can do....

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Postby anissa » July 24th, 2006, 1:53 am

Thanks for the advice so far :D

We havent found a 'trainer' yet Charles.. we're actually taking our first obedience class with both dogs at 'A Doggie Doo'. They mentioned it when we went to buy our Candiae, and we thought what the hell, it cant hurt. Once I have my surgery, I'll be looking into more one on one type training.. someone that can train ME how to work with the dogs. Any recommendations?

Jaida is actually very good with basic commands, sit, down, come.. etc. The only time she hesitates to do a command is either when she's excited and barking like crazy.. or if we say a command in too sharp or loud of a voice, and she cowards away. (she's very affraid of stern tone of voice and if we raise our hand too quickly). I cant get her attention with normal toned commands when she's barking, but if I make a command louder and stronger to actually get her attention.. she runs and hides under the table.

Coins in a can are a good idea to grab her attention, but at the same time I dont want to scare the crap out of her either.
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Postby SisMorphine » July 24th, 2006, 6:54 am

I DESPISE barking. Completely. And of course, I have a dog who does it at the drop of a hat (or ring of a doorbell, or movement of another dog, or open/closing of a door, or etc etc etc). Makes me want to stick sharp objects in my ears.

In kennel we put citronella collars on the barkers and it shuts them up. I tried that with him. He barked right through it until it was emptied and I ended up with a livingroom full of citronella. Gross.

I do not have the patience to deal with it. I'm just happy that he is now in retirement and should be going to a retirement home within the next two months. I'll stick with quiet dogs, thanks.

Good luck to you for putting up with the barking! And good luck with the training for it!
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Postby mnp13 » July 24th, 2006, 10:25 am

Most of the time penny cans make the dog afraid of penny cans.

A few people have brought up teaching a bark command so that you can teach a quiet command - and I think this is the best advice so far.

I cant get her attention with normal toned commands when she's barking, but if I make a command louder and stronger to actually get her attention.. she runs and hides under the table.

If she doesn't know "quiet" then yelling it at her isn't going to make a difference anyway. If you tell her sit and she sits but keeps barking you can't correct her anyway.

Please don't leave your dog in your yard on a run unattended.
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Postby rockermom » July 24th, 2006, 11:32 am

My dad has a dog who barks real scarry. Although he is a real baby. When my dad says quiet he quiets. My dad swears by teaching bark on command. "speak" in order to quiet them.
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Postby anissa » July 24th, 2006, 12:05 pm

My dogs are never left unsupervised.. indoors or outdoors.
(unless we are out and they are crated)

We've had Jaida for less than a week, so we're still trying to figure out what commands she is familiar with and not. She's been showing that she probably does know 'quiet' and 'enough'.. as long as we catch her attention before she gets too excited.

Infact when I started to post this, she jumped up at the sound of a lawn mower and the neighbor dogs barking.. one bark out of her and I said (sternly) "QUIET" and she shut up and went back down. This gives me hope!!

I may try the 'bark on command' method, however the only problem with that is that we cant get her to bark when we want her to! She's not an angry barker, or a bark for the hell of it barker.. she only does it when she hears a strange noise or see's a new person/dog and gets herself so worked up and excited.. at which point its hard to get her attention.

Maybe its not even the barking that we need to deal with, but trying to get her to stay calm enough to pay attention to a command.
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