Correcting your dog. (Long)

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Postby mnp13 » June 28th, 2006, 9:03 am

Mind_doc wrote: when I finally caught up to him
I thought there was only one way to teach him he can NEVER do this
again. I spanked him good and yelled like crazy. I felt SO bad about it
an hour later and even feel bad today, 12 year later. He never chased a
car again.


And that is what is called a "single learning event"
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
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Postby muse » June 28th, 2006, 9:23 am

mnp13 wrote:
Mind_doc wrote: when I finally caught up to him
I thought there was only one way to teach him he can NEVER do this
again. I spanked him good and yelled like crazy. I felt SO bad about it
an hour later and even feel bad today, 12 year later. He never chased a
car again.


And that is what is called a "single learning event"


Sometimes its all thats needed. Much better then the alternative.
The dissenter is every human being at those moments of his life when he resigns momentarily from the herd and thinks for himself.
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Postby Pitcrew » July 4th, 2006, 12:53 pm

Great post Nelson!

I think what people dont realize about "correction" is that they are CONSTANTLY either sensitizing (making more sensitive) or desensitizing (making less sensitive) their dogs.
When they find a dog becoming overly sensitive to an object or event the correction was more intense than necessary. And when not effective, not forceful enough (nagging) and the dog learns to ignore gradually escalating punishment. It must make an impression... but not be done in anger.
I have corrected my dogs with a squirt bottle... and also play with them with it, they often drink out of it. I have corrected them with a pillow, or other object close at hand to reach them from a distance to time a correction effectively... and with my hand. They are afraid of none of these things. It is about the intent (if you will) not the object... and the timing, proper intensity (amount of force) as it relates to the dogs will (or sensitivity), in relationship to the unwanted behavior.

Good posts all! Post on!
"Pedigree indicates what the animal should be;
Conformation indicates what the animal appears to be;
But, Performance indicates what the animal actually is."
- author unknown
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