Barking

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Postby mnp13 » June 6th, 2006, 10:48 am

My Dr asked me about coming to his house and training his little terrier. He's got some sort of "poo" dog I think. It's one of the designer ones. *gag*

She barks endlessly when she is put outside. Lots of barrier aggression at the invisible fence line.

Any ideas?
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Postby Malli » June 6th, 2006, 12:01 pm

I'm all ears on this one. I've never had to tackle this issue with Os.

Is the dog left outside when the owner is not around? If so, I think that will make things a little more complicated.

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Postby mnp13 » June 6th, 2006, 12:03 pm

Nope, the owners are home. He's just yappy and annoying.
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Postby msvette2u » June 6th, 2006, 12:03 pm

Invisible fence could be a problem. If the thing is left outside alone it could get chewed up pretty fast.
I have no idea. We have a fence and if they do the fence aggression thing too much we line it with hotwire. lol
No fluffy "poo" dogs here. ;)
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Postby mnp13 » June 6th, 2006, 12:06 pm

Getting rid of the IF is not going to happen. I tried that one already. They just want her to shut the heck up.
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Postby a-bull » June 6th, 2006, 12:11 pm

The I.F. shouldn't matter regarding the barking. My parents have three Toy Fox Terrier/Rat Terrier-type thingies, and even with regular fencing, they spend a good chunk of the day barking by the fence. We've yet to figure out how to stop them. We have intermittent success only.

I've heard those citronella collars can work, but I'd only use that as a weapon of last choice.

I've also heard if you can teach them to "speak" on command, it's easier to then make them stop on command.

When mine bark too much outside, I just say "in the house," and they stop barking and go in the house, but other than that :|
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Postby mnp13 » June 6th, 2006, 12:13 pm

the fence barking is barrier aggression, and that's what I need to "cure"
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Postby a-bull » June 6th, 2006, 12:22 pm

Did they put the I.F. in thinking it would curb the problem, because it can with some dogs, but not in this case, I guess . . .
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Postby mnp13 » June 6th, 2006, 12:26 pm

No, they had IF at their last house long before they got the little dog. It's fine for their Corgi.
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Postby a-bull » June 6th, 2006, 12:32 pm

Sounds futile, lol . . . seriously . . . as I'm sure you know, barking for some dogs, particularly little dogs, is like falling off a log.

Indoor barking I use "quiet," which I taught by rewarding the silence instantly with a treat.

When mine get barky and wound up in the fencing, I start out with "quiet," then I tell them to "leave it" to get them away from the fence. My last step if they keep resorting back because there's something irresistable on the other side, such as a deer, etc., is the "in the house."

Having said that, the only thing that works with my parent's T.F.T.'s is "in the house."
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Postby SisMorphine » June 6th, 2006, 1:06 pm

A cit collar usually doesn't work on small dogs because their bark isn't deep enough.

Not sure how to cure barrier aggression. It's a touchy thing because if you use the wrong methods they could become more barrier aggressive.

I'd refer them to a highly qualified pro who's been doing this stuff for years.

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If it was me and I had a small dog that was barking I would feed it to Wally. I do not like a barking dog . . .
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Postby dogcrazyjen » June 6th, 2006, 1:10 pm

I had a dog who needed to be shown it was not his job to guard the house. He was not allowed out alone after beginning training for months, and was played with (frisbee, ball) the whole time, or doing obedience on leash. The dog learned to ignore the stimulus outside. He also learned the owners were in charge, to greet people, to protect the house, rather than leaving it all to him.

IF can cause aggression by correcting interest in other dogs, making the connection of other dogs=pain.


May not fit, but that has been something that worked for me.
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Postby msvette2u » June 6th, 2006, 1:19 pm

That's what we have to do with Yaeger. He is a GSD so automatically has the guarding instinct. We've politely let him know that WE make the decisions as to who can come and go, and it makes a difference but this is a constant for us. He gets frustrated but he's learning.
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Postby msvette2u » June 6th, 2006, 1:30 pm

mnp13 wrote:the fence barking is barrier aggression, and that's what I need to "cure"


This comes from the dog behavior classes we sat through in my training as an ACO...
Barrier "aggression" is simply frustration that has escalated. She might be just frustrated at this point and not necessarily aggressive.
I think Jen's suggestions to play with the dog outside and not let it get distracted by the fence might be a good way to go. Also redirecting the dog quickly and treating it for successful redirection, if it becomes distracted by the "barrier" the IF, might work.
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Postby a-bull » June 6th, 2006, 1:50 pm

dogcrazyjen wrote:I had a dog who needed to be shown it was not his job to guard the house. He was not allowed out alone after beginning training for months, and was played with (frisbee, ball) the whole time, or doing obedience on leash. The dog learned to ignore the stimulus outside. He also learned the owners were in charge, to greet people, to protect the house, rather than leaving it all to him.

IF can cause aggression by correcting interest in other dogs, making the connection of other dogs=pain.


May not fit, but that has been something that worked for me.


I.F. shouldn't be "correcting interest in other dogs." If this is happening, the dog wasn't trained on it properly, and if the dog was trained on it properly and is that interested in other dogs, it shouldn't be used.
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Postby a-bull » June 6th, 2006, 1:51 pm

SisMorphine wrote:A cit collar usually doesn't work on small dogs because their bark isn't deep enough.

Not sure how to cure barrier aggression. It's a touchy thing because if you use the wrong methods they could become more barrier aggressive.

I'd refer them to a highly qualified pro who's been doing this stuff for years.

ETA
If it was me and I had a small dog that was barking I would feed it to Wally. I do not like a barking dog . . .


Didn't know that about the citronella collars.

How'd you like to be their neighbor, lol . . .
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Postby a-bull » June 6th, 2006, 1:57 pm

I did find a remote citronella collar, which you control the spray on . . . so that probably will work on a small dog . . .
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Postby SisMorphine » June 6th, 2006, 2:06 pm

a-bull wrote:I did find a remote citronella collar, which you control the spray on . . . so that probably will work on a small dog . . .

Yeah I saw that the other day and I am VERY tempted to get one.
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Postby msvette2u » June 6th, 2006, 2:10 pm

IF corrects everything, if the dog gets too close? :|
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Postby a-bull » June 6th, 2006, 2:10 pm

Who barks in your house??

If you're going to try one, hurry up so you can tell Michelle, lol . . .
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