AKC CGC TEST www.akc.org

This forum is all about training and behavior. Everything from potty training to working titles!

Postby Maryellen » January 7th, 2006, 7:01 pm

for those of you that want to get the CGC title, here is the test:

Before taking the Canine Good Citizen test, owners will sign the Responsible Dog Owners Pledge. We believe that responsible dog ownership is a key part of the CGC concept and by signing the pledge, owners agree to take care of their dog's health needs, safety, exercise, training and quality of life. Owners also agree to show responsibility by doing things such as cleaning up after their dogs in public places and never letting dogs infringe on the rights of others.

After signing the Responsible Dog Owners Pledge, owners and their dogs are ready to take the CGC Test. Items on the Canine Good Citizen Test include:

Test 1: Accepting a friendly stranger
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to approach it and speak to the handler in a natural, everyday situation. The evaluator walks up to the dog and handler and greets the handler in a friendly manner, ignoring the dog. The evaluator and handler shake hands and exchange pleasantries. The dog must show no sign of resentment or shyness, and must not break position or try to go to the evaluator.

Test 2: Sitting politely for petting
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to touch it while it is out with its handler. With the dog sitting at the handler's side, to begin the exercise, the evaluator pets the dog on the head and body. The handler may talk to his or her dog throughout the exercise. The dog may stand in place as it is petted. The dog must not show shyness or resentment.

Test 3: Appearance and grooming
This practical test demonstrates that the dog will welcome being groomed and examined and will permit someone, such as a veterinarian, groomer or friend of the owner, to do so. It also demonstrates the owner's care, concern and sense of responsibility. The evaluator inspects the dog to determine if it is clean and groomed. The dog must appear to be in healthy condition (i.e., proper weight, clean, healthy and alert). The handler should supply the comb or brush commonly used on the dog. The evaluator then softly combs or brushes the dog, and in a natural manner, lightly examines the ears and gently picks up each front foot. It is not necessary for the dog to hold a specific position during the examination, and the handler may talk to the dog, praise it and give encouragement throughout.

Test 4: Out for a walk (walking on a loose lead)
This test demonstrates that the handler is in control of the dog. The dog may be on either side of the handler. The dog's position should leave no doubt that the dog is attentive to the handler and is responding to the handler's movements and changes of direction. The dog need not be perfectly aligned with the handler and need not sit when the handler stops. The evaluator may use a pre-plotted course or may direct the handler/dog team by issuing instructions or commands. In either case, there should be a right turn, left turn, and an about turn with at least one stop in between and another at the end. The handler may talk to the dog along the way, praise the dog, or give commands in a normal tone of voice. The handler may sit the dog at the halts if desired.

Test 5: Walking through a crowd
This test demonstrates that the dog can move about politely in pedestrian traffic and is under control in public places. The dog and handler walk around and pass close to several people (at least three). The dog may show some interest in the strangers but should continue to walk with the handler, without evidence of over-exuberance, shyness or resentment. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise the dog throughout the test. The dog should not jump on people in the crowd or strain on the leash.

Test 6: Sit and down on command and Staying in place
This test demonstrates that the dog has training, will respond to the handler's commands to sit and down and will remain in the place commanded by the handler (sit or down position, whichever the handler prefers). The dog must do sit AND down on command, then the owner chooses the position for leaving the dog in the stay. Prior to this test, the dog's leash is replaced with a line 20 feet long. The handler may take a reasonable amount of time and use more than one command to get the dog to sit and then down. The evaluator must determine if the dog has responded to the handler's commands. The handler may not force the dog into position but may touch the dog to offer gentle guidance. When instructed by the evaluator, the handler tells the dog to stay and walks forward the length of the line, turns and returns to the dog at a natural pace. The dog must remain in the place in which it was left (it may change position) until the evaluator instructs the handler to release the dog. The dog may be released from the front or the side.

Test 7: Coming when called
This test demonstrates that the dog will come when called by the handler. The handler will walk 10 feet from the dog, turn to face the dog, and call the dog. The handler may use encouragement to get the dog to come. Handlers may choose to tell dogs to "stay" or "wait" or they may simply walk away, giving no instructions to the dog.

Test 8: Reaction to another dog
This test demonstrates that the dog can behave politely around other dogs. Two handlers and their dogs approach each other from a distance of about 20 feet, stop, shake hands and exchange pleasantries, and continue on for about 10 feet. The dogs should show no more than casual interest in each other. Neither dog should go to the other dog or its handler.

Test 9: Reaction to distraction
This test demonstrates that the dog is confident at all times when faced with common distracting situations. The evaluator will select and present two distractions. Examples of distractions include dropping a chair, rolling a crate dolly past the dog, having a jogger run in front of the dog, or dropping a crutch or cane. The dog may express natural interest and curiosity and/or may appear slightly startled but should not panic, try to run away, show aggressiveness, or bark. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise it throughout the exercise.

Test 10: Supervised separation
This test demonstrates that a dog can be left with a trusted person, if necessary, and will maintain training and good manners. Evaluators are encouraged to say something like, "Would you like me to watch your dog?" and then take hold of the dog's leash. The owner will go out of sight for three minutes. The dog does not have to stay in position but should not continually bark, whine, or pace unnecessarily, or show anything stronger than mild agitation or nervousness. Evaluators may talk to the dog but should not engage in excessive talking, petting, or management attempts (e.g, "there, there, it's alright").

Equipment

All tests must be performed on leash. Dogs should wear well-fitting buckle or slip collars made of leather, fabric, or chain. Special training collars such as pinch collars, head halters, etc. are not permitted in the CGC test. We recognize that special training collars may be very useful tools for beginning dog trainers, however, we feel that dogs are ready to take the CGC test at the point at which they are transitioned to regular collars.

The evaluator supplies a 20-foot lead for the test. The owner/handler should bring the dog's brush or comb to the test.

Encouragement

Owners/handlers may use praise and encouragement throughout the test. The owner may pet the dog between exercises. Food and treats are not permitted during testing, nor is the use of toys, squeaky toys, etc. to get the dog to do something. We recognize that food and toys may provide valuable reinforcement or encouragement during the training process but these items should not be used during the test.

Failures - Dismissals

Any dog that eliminates during testing must be marked failed. The only exception to this rule is that elimination is allowable in test Item 10, but only when test Item 10 is held outdoors.

Any dog that growls, snaps, bites, attacks, or attempts to attack a person or another dog is not a good citizen and must be dismissed from the test.
_________________
Last edited by Maryellen on February 26th, 2006, 7:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Maryellen
I live here
 
Posts: 5971

Postby Conners » January 22nd, 2006, 1:30 am

In Canada it's called the CGN.
Due to the ban and the Pit bull breeds needing to be Super Dogs, the course is extremely important for our bullies right now. Shasta and I have just started and already there is a vast difference.
Because of nerve damage to my hands and arms, plus other health problems, I couldn't walk Shasta without a Halti or Gentle Leader. To what some may call a simple tug or pull, to me could feel like my arm was being ripped out at times. NEVER did I ever think I could walk her without the face gear...well with the exception of her muzzle.
I've not needed the Gentle Leader or Halti ever since and not only that, she walks on a loose leash, even with distractions.
I can't wait until the next class and Shasta loves it too.
User avatar
Conners
Just Whelped
 
Posts: 26
Location: London, Ontario, Canada

Postby SisMorphine » January 25th, 2006, 1:35 am

I would like to let all of you bully owners know that my Grey failed this test MISERABLY in the mock-testing session we had in training class (not class on how to train a dog, but a class training us to train dogs . . . kind of like a pre-trainer class).

I am enormously jealous of Bully owners who can pass this test with flying colors. And just remember to tell people that you and your "dangerous dog" passed this test perfectly, while me and my "sedate, loving and sweet" Greyhound failed it like champs!!!
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
SisMorphine
They're like service dogs gone wrong.
 
Posts: 9231

Postby Hoyden » January 25th, 2006, 1:34 pm

Conners wrote:In Canada it's called the CGN.
Due to the ban and the Pit bull breeds needing to be Super Dogs, the course is extremely important for our bullies right now. Shasta and I have just started and already there is a vast difference.
Because of nerve damage to my hands and arms, plus other health problems, I couldn't walk Shasta without a Halti or Gentle Leader. To what some may call a simple tug or pull, to me could feel like my arm was being ripped out at times. NEVER did I ever think I could walk her without the face gear...well with the exception of her muzzle.
I've not needed the Gentle Leader or Halti ever since and not only that, she walks on a loose leash, even with distractions.
I can't wait until the next class and Shasta loves it too.


I had a problem holding onto the leash when the arthritis in my hands flared, so a vendor at the Ren Faire made me nifty leash hooker thing that goes on my belt.

It's a leather loop with a leash clip on it. I clip the leash to the hook and she is attached to my waist. I had to shorten the leash because I was tripping on it, so I sewed another handle into the leash 3/4 way down towards the leashes' clip.
Moral courage is the most valuable and usually the most absent characteristic in men ~ General George S. Patton, Jr.

She taking all the stars down from her sky to hang them up someplace new, where there's better weather and the sky's a different blue. ~ Autumn Fields
User avatar
Hoyden
Collar Queen
 
Posts: 3342
Location: Hot, Hot Texas, Baby!

Postby Conners » January 25th, 2006, 2:54 pm

SisMorphine wrote:I would like to let all of you bully owners know that my Grey failed this test MISERABLY in the mock-testing session we had in training class (not class on how to train a dog, but a class training us to train dogs . . . kind of like a pre-trainer class).

I am enormously jealous of Bully owners who can pass this test with flying colors. And just remember to tell people that you and your "dangerous dog" passed this test perfectly, while me and my "sedate, loving and sweet" Greyhound failed it like champs!!!


:D The lovable Greyhound thankfully isn't on the restricted list, and that would be crazier than putting our bullies on the list. Thanks for the giggle. My insides are breaking up.

Hoyden wrote:I had a problem holding onto the leash when the arthritis in my hands flared, so a vendor at the Ren Faire made me nifty leash hooker thing that goes on my belt.

It's a leather loop with a leash clip on it. I clip the leash to the hook and she is attached to my waist. I had to shorten the leash because I was tripping on it, so I sewed another handle into the leash 3/4 way down towards the leashes' clip.


I also have a leash that has another handle 3/4 way down, but I bought it that way. It's the first time I've never needed to hold it though and that's without the halti or gentle leader neither. Without the pulling, I find no need to have to HANG ON! LOL
Shasta has always been super frendly and at home it was to a fault. She showed her excitement by jumping up and licking people to death. The first 15 minutes of someone coming in was shear frustration on my part. A 50 pound friendly dog is quite the weight. Now with this training, she's sooooo different as she knows if she wants to get patted, she needs to remember her manners.
We missed last Saturdays training as our trainer was sick, so I can hardly wait until this Saturday. We have our books, so I have been practicing in advance as much of it she already knows very well. Like the 'sit' and 'stay'. I've actually cooked supper came back and rewarded her with 'Good stay' and her treat. That was like about 15 minutes, so I know she has that down pat and because I use her as my uncertified Service Dog, she is already great with distractions and the public.
Hopefully with our new election, amendments may be made that I can actually get her properly certified. It would make my life a whole lot easier. :!:
User avatar
Conners
Just Whelped
 
Posts: 26
Location: London, Ontario, Canada

Postby Maryellen » January 25th, 2006, 3:06 pm

people with disabilities CAN take the CGC... the AKC does make exceptions for certain items. i will ask them if this is an exception...
Maryellen
I live here
 
Posts: 5971

Postby Conners » January 25th, 2006, 6:39 pm

Maryellen wrote:people with disabilities CAN take the CGC... the AKC does make exceptions for certain items. i will ask them if this is an exception...

I was referring to get Shasta certified as a Service Dog, not the CGN (CGC) course. I have Shasta in the CGN course and doing very well.
But trying to get her certified in Ontario as my Service Dog is another story.
I don't have a problem about her needing to wear her muzzle while out in public as she doesn't require her mouth to help me with my disabilities, Maryellen. What I do need her certified for is to be able to take her into the stores, rather than me trying to carry heavy things out to her wagon or sled, depending on the weather.
Also, I rush and forget most of what I need because I fear her being tied outside and she could get stolen or hurt. There are some weirdo's who would love to get their hands on a pit bull breed for things I don't even want to think about and that scares me.
I also need her for going on the bus with me to get me to doctor and specialist appointments because of phobia's, cognative thinking and memory problems. When she is with me, I don't panic in situations that I normally would.
She's brought me a long way in 3 years, but if she were allowed to be certified as a service dog, I wouldn't be stuck within such a small radius and could live a more 'normal?' life.
User avatar
Conners
Just Whelped
 
Posts: 26
Location: London, Ontario, Canada

Postby annieinpa » February 25th, 2006, 4:05 pm

I would love to test petie for this, but first i have to get him to stop jumpin all the time.

which i got some great advice on that from a member on here.

Thanks!!
User avatar
annieinpa
Snot Nose Bully Pup
 
Posts: 151
Location: NEPA

Postby concreterose » March 2nd, 2006, 12:15 pm

I took Vicki to the mock test, and boy am I glad I did! She did great on all areas except the sitting while being greeted and the neutral dog (It was a Newfoundland). She did NOT like him at all. We finished the loose lead crowd section and were heading out of the section and she tried to take a dive at him. Luckily I was watching her the whole time, and hissed for her to leave it before anybody saw. Needless to say, I didn't take her back.
User avatar
concreterose
Loyally Bully
 
Posts: 719

Postby Maryellen » March 2nd, 2006, 12:25 pm

mill, alot of dogs do what vicki did.. i have tested some dogs that you would think would be ok with the neutral dog and they flipped out.. some people will take the mock test to see what they need or want to work on, depending on what they are doing with their dog.. if you are worried about vicki lunging at other dogs in public you can always work with her on not doing this, if the mock cgcs are free and you can go to as many as possible i would do it so that she learns when she is out with you she must behave...
Maryellen
I live here
 
Posts: 5971

Postby concreterose » March 2nd, 2006, 12:36 pm

Maryellen wrote:mill, alot of dogs do what vicki did.. i have tested some dogs that you would think would be ok with the neutral dog and they flipped out.. some people will take the mock test to see what they need or want to work on, depending on what they are doing with their dog.. if you are worried about vicki lunging at other dogs in public you can always work with her on not doing this, if the mock cgcs are free and you can go to as many as possible i would do it so that she learns when she is out with you she must behave...


Yeah, I do that anyway! She never lunges at other dogs when we are out, because she knows if she runs to me she will get a treat. She's never lunged at any dogs in agility either, she parks it in front of me or lays down. :|
I honestly think it was a lot of tension in the atmosphere and maybe she picked up on me being nervous. As soon as we went in the facility, everyone started whispering, and I heard someone say 'look at that little pit bull' and then this guy came in and said 'is that a PIT? whoa, let me get out of here'...plus THREE dogs lunged at Vicki and she didn't do anything, just looked at me. Then a fourth one lunged at her and almost nipped at her, and she jumped up (still didn't do anything) but a couple people came over and was like 'did she lunge at that dog?' My sister got really pissed at them and told them that she knew they saw all those dogs lunging at Vicki and didn't excuse them...so they were singling Vicki out and didn't do anything. Then they tried to back pedal and say they noticed how she was paying attention to me when the other dogs were bothering her. Needless to say, after all of that, by the time our turn came up my nerves were frazzled and I'm sure she picked up on it...I'm surprised she did as well as she did. I am going to have to try a more bully friendly atmosphere the next time I decide to try it...but that experience just totally turned me off to the test.
User avatar
concreterose
Loyally Bully
 
Posts: 719

Postby Maryellen » March 2nd, 2006, 12:42 pm

stupid ignorant idiot &%^&*$^*^(*& people.... what ignorant idiots to do that to you .grrrrrrrr.. its amazing, the only dog to behave is the one that the people want to destroy... yes, vicki probably picked up on ALL the tension in the room, from you and the stupid people.. which isnt her fault or yours.. i would have flipped my lid too if they said that stuff to me.. i would say keep working with her, if she behaves with you outside then it was the tension in the place.. can you find another place that gives mock tests?? or maybe when the weather is nicer they might give the mock test in parks.. also, you can find a cgc tester near you , go to http://www.akc.org, and type in the search section cgc, then it will bring up all info, and you can find testers near you that you can contact to do the test.. all cgc testers can give the test without an event or anything, they just need 3 people for a crowd, and a tester dog for you and vicki to do that part of the test.. i am giving the test saturday and i have only 2 dogs registered for the test.. sometimes, when its less of a crowd the tension is lessened.. dam those stupid ignorant people...
Maryellen
I live here
 
Posts: 5971

Postby mnp13 » March 2nd, 2006, 12:48 pm

Ruby's CGC/TDI test was aweful, her test was nothing like the test given to the other dogs.

I posted about it on PBF forever ago, if someone could find it for me that would be great.
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
User avatar
mnp13
Evil Overlord
 
Posts: 17232
Location: Rochester, NY

Postby Maryellen » March 2nd, 2006, 12:55 pm

the test should be the same for every dog irregardless of breed.. if they were unfair to ruby you should have filed a written complaint.
Maryellen
I live here
 
Posts: 5971

Postby mnp13 » March 2nd, 2006, 1:07 pm

Maryellen wrote:the test should be the same for every dog irregardless of breed.. if they were unfair to ruby you should have filed a written complaint.

I know.... we just let it go because it wouldn't have done any good, and would have screwed us for Delta certification because she is the Delta person in the area.
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
User avatar
mnp13
Evil Overlord
 
Posts: 17232
Location: Rochester, NY

Postby Maryellen » March 2nd, 2006, 1:10 pm

they cant do that.. they cant penalize you if they are the only delta person in the area.. that is a crock.. you should have reported them... ruby can do tdi, bright and beautiful too if delta was such an ass.. and i would have reported them big time, and kept on until something was done..
Maryellen
I live here
 
Posts: 5971

Postby mnp13 » March 2nd, 2006, 1:27 pm

Well, there is what 'should' happen and what did happen.

It was 2 years ago, so it's really a moot point.
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
User avatar
mnp13
Evil Overlord
 
Posts: 17232
Location: Rochester, NY

Postby Maryellen » March 2nd, 2006, 1:35 pm

oh, i thought it was more recent..
Maryellen
I live here
 
Posts: 5971

Postby mnp13 » March 4th, 2006, 9:07 pm

thanks to CinderDee for finding this for me!

this was my post from the day after Ruby's CGC/TDI test:

Ruby is AWESOME!

Anyway, she passed her CGC and TDI yesterday with flying colors. Out of the group tested she is the ONLY one of 5 tested that should have passed, and I'm not just saying that because I'm her 'mom'.

Let's see, we had the pug who growled at the other dog during the meet and greet, and then pulled and barked during the 3 minute separation.

The Jack Russel who had to be corrected off his feet during the leave it - all three times.

The yellow Lab who wouldn't heel, sit or 'leave' anything.

Golden Retreiver 1 who didn't heel, sit, stay, or leave it until the 50th command everytime.

Golden Retreiver 2 who jumped on the tester three different times during the test.

Then there was Ruby... who was basically mounted during the crowd scene and repeatedly smacked in the back of the head. She had an extended - as in minutes long - grooming/handeling sequence. And her heeling, though perfect, included fast and slow walking and about 10 turns. She passed (I doubt ANY of the dogs would have failed) but she was the only one who was actually tested.

It really pissed me off that the other dogs did not have to earn their certifications. But I know Ruby did.

I'm proud of her.
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
User avatar
mnp13
Evil Overlord
 
Posts: 17232
Location: Rochester, NY

Postby Malli » April 6th, 2006, 4:11 am

Test 1: Accepting a friendly stranger
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to approach it and speak to the handler in a natural, everyday situation. The evaluator walks up to the dog and handler and greets the handler in a friendly manner, ignoring the dog. The evaluator and handler shake hands and exchange pleasantries. The dog must show no sign of resentment or shyness, and must not break position or try to go to the evaluator.
We'd fail, Os can resist a stranger in that close proximity, if they are right next to us and they are talking to me, they must be friends.

Test 2: Sitting politely for petting
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to touch it while it is out with its handler. With the dog sitting at the handler's side, to begin the exercise, the evaluator pets the dog on the head and body. The handler may talk to his or her dog throughout the exercise. The dog may stand in place as it is petted. The dog must not show shyness or resentment.
Same deal again, people are his best excuse for breaking his command. And of course, they all say "its ok, I encouraged him" :rolleyes2:

Test 3: Appearance and grooming
This practical test demonstrates that the dog will welcome being groomed and examined and will permit someone, such as a veterinarian, groomer or friend of the owner, to do so. It also demonstrates the owner's care, concern and sense of responsibility. The evaluator inspects the dog to determine if it is clean and groomed. The dog must appear to be in healthy condition (i.e., proper weight, clean, healthy and alert). The handler should supply the comb or brush commonly used on the dog. The evaluator then softly combs or brushes the dog, and in a natural manner, lightly examines the ears and gently picks up each front foot. It is not necessary for the dog to hold a specific position during the examination, and the handler may talk to the dog, praise it and give encouragement throughout.
We'd pass with flying colors! :D They could examine his back molars if they wanted!

Test 4: Out for a walk (walking on a loose lead)
This test demonstrates that the handler is in control of the dog. The dog may be on either side of the handler. The dog's position should leave no doubt that the dog is attentive to the handler and is responding to the handler's movements and changes of direction. The dog need not be perfectly aligned with the handler and need not sit when the handler stops. The evaluator may use a pre-plotted course or may direct the handler/dog team by issuing instructions or commands. In either case, there should be a right turn, left turn, and an about turn with at least one stop in between and another at the end. The handler may talk to the dog along the way, praise the dog, or give commands in a normal tone of voice. The handler may sit the dog at the halts if desired.
I think we'd do pretty good

Test 5: Walking through a crowd
This test demonstrates that the dog can move about politely in pedestrian traffic and is under control in public places. The dog and handler walk around and pass close to several people (at least three). The dog may show some interest in the strangers but should continue to walk with the handler, without evidence of over-exuberance, shyness or resentment. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise the dog throughout the test. The dog should not jump on people in the crowd or strain on the leash.
we should do well on this too. We're pros at crowd walking!

Test 6: Sit and down on command and Staying in place
This test demonstrates that the dog has training, will respond to the handler's commands to sit and down and will remain in the place commanded by the handler (sit or down position, whichever the handler prefers). The dog must do sit AND down on command, then the owner chooses the position for leaving the dog in the stay. Prior to this test, the dog's leash is replaced with a line 20 feet long. The handler may take a reasonable amount of time and use more than one command to get the dog to sit and then down. The evaluator must determine if the dog has responded to the handler's commands. The handler may not force the dog into position but may touch the dog to offer gentle guidance. When instructed by the evaluator, the handler tells the dog to stay and walks forward the length of the line, turns and returns to the dog at a natural pace. The dog must remain in the place in which it was left (it may change position) until the evaluator instructs the handler to release the dog. The dog may be released from the front or the side.
we'd ace this too!

Test 7: Coming when called
This test demonstrates that the dog will come when called by the handler. The handler will walk 10 feet from the dog, turn to face the dog, and call the dog. The handler may use encouragement to get the dog to come. Handlers may choose to tell dogs to "stay" or "wait" or they may simply walk away, giving no instructions to the dog.
no problem!

Test 8: Reaction to another dog
This test demonstrates that the dog can behave politely around other dogs. Two handlers and their dogs approach each other from a distance of about 20 feet, stop, shake hands and exchange pleasantries, and continue on for about 10 feet. The dogs should show no more than casual interest in each other. Neither dog should go to the other dog or its handler.
uh-oh :nono:

Test 9: Reaction to distraction
This test demonstrates that the dog is confident at all times when faced with common distracting situations. The evaluator will select and present two distractions. Examples of distractions include dropping a chair, rolling a crate dolly past the dog, having a jogger run in front of the dog, or dropping a crutch or cane. The dog may express natural interest and curiosity and/or may appear slightly startled but should not panic, try to run away, show aggressiveness, or bark. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise it throughout the exercise.
we'd sail that one! I took him to the Canada day fireworks one year, he was like "mom, why can we keep walking? I'm bored!

Test 10: Supervised separation
This test demonstrates that a dog can be left with a trusted person, if necessary, and will maintain training and good manners. Evaluators are encouraged to say something like, "Would you like me to watch your dog?" and then take hold of the dog's leash. The owner will go out of sight for three minutes. The dog does not have to stay in position but should not continually bark, whine, or pace unnecessarily, or show anything stronger than mild agitation or nervousness. Evaluators may talk to the dog but should not engage in excessive talking, petting, or management attempts (e.g, "there, there, it's alright").
we should do well here too. Lol, my boy is a little independant !

Equipment

All tests must be performed on leash. Dogs should wear well-fitting buckle or slip collars made of leather, fabric, or chain. Special training collars such as pinch collars, head halters, etc. are not permitted in the CGC test. We recognize that special training collars may be very useful tools for beginning dog trainers, however, we feel that dogs are ready to take the CGC test at the point at which they are transitioned to regular collars.

And of course we couldn't enter because right now we are working with the prong or pinch collar...



Michelle, did you have Ruby on a different collar at the time of the test?

I'm not sure where else I'd be able to fix this stuff except in a class...

Its a little depressing, I definately see the holes in our training very clearly...

Malli
User avatar
Malli
E-I-E-I-O!
 
Posts: 6341
Location: CANADA EH?

Next

Return to Training & Behavior

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users