? for raw-feeders

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Postby turtle » May 24th, 2006, 1:14 am

SpiritFngrz wrote:When my husband goes hunting I give the heart and liver to Sismorphine for Wally. Those things weigh a ton!!!
Liver is gross


Yummm!!! But those parts are good eating! We used to eat the fresh deer liver but it's a bit strong tasting so now Fremiet gets it. Deer liver is big too!

We still eat the deer heart. Soak it over night in salt water, slice it thin, flour it and fry it up in an iron pan with onions.... It's really good and not strong tasting at all. Soaking it in the salt water takes the gamey taste away and tenderizes it.

Heart is considered mucsle meat and not really organ meat but it's good for them no matter what you call it...
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Postby turtle » May 24th, 2006, 1:19 am

bahamutt99 wrote:Hehe. This reminds me of when my husband hit a deer. I yelled at him for not bringing home some of the organs for Loki. (But dang that venison tasted good!)


A lot of states will allow you to take road kill deer. If you are the unlucky one who hit it, well, then you know how fresh the meat is. Some of it would be bruised but often you can get some good eating off of one.

A friend of ours has wolves and he picks up a lot of road kill for them. Great natural food for a wolf! And I am sure the wolves don't care if the meat's a bit high.
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Postby SpiritFngrz » May 24th, 2006, 10:25 am

Magnolia618 wrote:Yeah, liver is pretty nasty.

I'm SO excited because my boss is giving me venison that she doesnt eat!!!

There are TONS of hunters around me, I really need to find someone to give me the stuff they dont want.


Yes my husband guts them out in the field and brings in the liver and heart to put in the freezer for Sismorphine. If he left it out there the coyotes would just eat it.
Just tell them to save the organs for you!
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Postby SpiritFngrz » May 24th, 2006, 10:27 am

gf turtle wrote:
SpiritFngrz wrote:When my husband goes hunting I give the heart and liver to Sismorphine for Wally. Those things weigh a ton!!!
Liver is gross


Yummm!!! But those parts are good eating! We used to eat the fresh deer liver but it's a bit strong tasting so now Fremiet gets it. Deer liver is big too!

We still eat the deer heart. Soak it over night in salt water, slice it thin, flour it and fry it up in an iron pan with onions.... It's really good and not strong tasting at all. Soaking it in the salt water takes the gamey taste away and tenderizes it.

Heart is considered mucsle meat and not really organ meat but it's good for them no matter what you call it...


Yes, my father-in-law said that. He said the heart is good-eatin'.
I don't know if I could do it though. I'd just as soon let the dogs have it.
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Postby ccc2006 » May 25th, 2006, 9:21 am

Does anyone have any information on feeding raw fish as the main protein?
What kinds of fish, daily amounts, preparation if any? Any drawbacks?
Hopefully someone has some good information on that.

Anne Marie
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Postby mnp13 » May 25th, 2006, 10:25 am

Magnolia618 wrote:The best was when someone gave me a huge cooler full of organic, free-range, local, fresh beef...

... and I fed it to the dogs. :twisted:

I remember that post... I was ready to strangle you !!!!

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Postby cheekymunkee » May 25th, 2006, 10:31 am

ccc2006 wrote:Does anyone have any information on feeding raw fish as the main protein?
What kinds of fish, daily amounts, preparation if any? Any drawbacks?
Hopefully someone has some good information on that.

Anne Marie


I wouldn't feed it exclusively but that is just me, I don't know of a reason not to though. I feed a variety or meats. No prep needed just try to avoid salmon. I have fed talapia with no problems at all. In fact, fish is very good for them. Mine weren't thrilled with it fresh but they ate it. Daily amounts should be the same as for any other protein source.
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Postby muse » May 25th, 2006, 11:19 am

Ive recently found a slaughterhouse really close to my house. Up until then I had thought of buying raw online, but Id rather just get it fresh every few weeks from the butcher.

Whats the best way to introduce raw? What meats should I start with? Should I introduce organs quickly or just wean them in over the course of time? Also, what supliments should I use if any? Id LOVE to do raw & kibble, but Ive read that that isnt the best idea. Any suggestions?
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Postby SpiritFngrz » May 25th, 2006, 11:32 am

cheekymunkee wrote:
ccc2006 wrote:Does anyone have any information on feeding raw fish as the main protein?
What kinds of fish, daily amounts, preparation if any? Any drawbacks?
Hopefully someone has some good information on that.

Anne Marie


I wouldn't feed it exclusively but that is just me, I don't know of a reason not to though. I feed a variety or meats. No prep needed just try to avoid salmon. I have fed talapia with no problems at all. In fact, fish is very good for them. Mine weren't thrilled with it fresh but they ate it. Daily amounts should be the same as for any other protein source.


What about mercury in fish? I think tilapia is low so that's probably a good one.
What's wrong with salmon?
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Postby cheekymunkee » May 25th, 2006, 11:48 am

SpiritFngrz wrote:
cheekymunkee wrote:
ccc2006 wrote:Does anyone have any information on feeding raw fish as the main protein?
What kinds of fish, daily amounts, preparation if any? Any drawbacks?
Hopefully someone has some good information on that.

Anne Marie


I wouldn't feed it exclusively but that is just me, I don't know of a reason not to though. I feed a variety or meats. No prep needed just try to avoid salmon. I have fed talapia with no problems at all. In fact, fish is very good for them. Mine weren't thrilled with it fresh but they ate it. Daily amounts should be the same as for any other protein source.


What about mercury in fish? I think tilapia is low so that's probably a good one.
What's wrong with salmon?


Mercury. :wink: :D
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Postby Magnolia618 » May 25th, 2006, 8:15 pm

SpiritFngrz wrote:
cheekymunkee wrote:
ccc2006 wrote:Does anyone have any information on feeding raw fish as the main protein?
What kinds of fish, daily amounts, preparation if any? Any drawbacks?
Hopefully someone has some good information on that.

Anne Marie


I wouldn't feed it exclusively but that is just me, I don't know of a reason not to though. I feed a variety or meats. No prep needed just try to avoid salmon. I have fed talapia with no problems at all. In fact, fish is very good for them. Mine weren't thrilled with it fresh but they ate it. Daily amounts should be the same as for any other protein source.


What about mercury in fish? I think tilapia is low so that's probably a good one.
What's wrong with salmon?


Maggie freaked me out when she would not touch talapia. WTF? Maggie eats evvvvverything.
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Postby msvette2u » May 25th, 2006, 9:47 pm

Actually no - there is something called Salmon Poisoning and it doesn't have to do with Mercury at all.

http://www.metpet.com/Reference/Dogs/He ... n_dogs.htm


Salmon Poisoning Disease

This is primarily a problem in the Pacific Northwest and California. But if you feed a raw meat diet it can be a problem anywhere.

It is caused from the infection by a rickettsial organism,Neorickettsia helminthoeca. SPD has been known since the early 19th century in North America. It had been observed that dogs that ate raw salmon frequently died however the connection between the fluke and the rickettsia was not established at this time.(1) It is unusual in that the rickettsial organism does not directly infect the dog but is instead carried by a parasite, a trematode (flatworm or fluke) called Nanophyteus salmincola through two intermediate hosts first: freshwater snails and salmonid fish (salmon, trout and steelhead).

Nanophyteus salmincola are found to infect freshwater snails particularly Oxytrema plicifer. The infected snail forms part of the salmonid species food web and is ingested. Neither the fluke nor the rickettsial organism act as pathogens in the fish. The dog is exposed only when it ingests the secondary host - an infected fish. After the dog ingests the fish, the encysted fluke larvae burst and embed in the dog’s intestinal tract and the rickettsia are introduced. The cycle continues when ova are excreted in dog feces to infect snails.

It is necessary for your dog to eat raw salmon to get salmon poisoning disease.


A sudden onset of symptoms occur 5-7 days after ingestion of fish.Initial symptoms include lethargy and anorexia. Peaking of temperature between 104-107 in the first two days and then slowly returns to normal. Persistent vomiting by the fourth day. There is bloody diarrhea within a few days of vomiting onset. The diarrhea is often bright yellow color. There are enlarged lymph nodes.

In the acute stages, gastrointestinal symptoms are quite similar to canine parvovirus. Nasal and ocular symptoms can resemble canine distemper. If left untreated, SPD has a mortality rate of up to 90%. Treatment is supportive to maintain hydration as well as antibiotic therapy to kill the disease producing organism. Dogs that survive are immune.


It is preventable by cooking all fish before feeding your dog. If you are outdoors hiking or camping or live near streams and rivers were salmon spawn, keep a close eye on your dog on don't let your pet run free to insure that no fish carcasses are ingested. Please see your vet immediately if you suspect your dog has ingested raw salmon.
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