What Makes A Reputable Rescue?

Postby Maryellen » May 17th, 2006, 3:29 pm

A reputable rescue puts the dogs in its care FIRST. a reputable rescue does the following:

1. take only the dogs they can handle in.
2. gets every dog vetted and speutered prior to adopting out, and preferably before they go to a foster home with resident dogs.
3. Does specific screening for forever homes.
4. Does NOT adopt out to rentals or people in college(unstable living conditions)
5. Assesses the temperment of every dog that enters the program, and follows strict guidelines for temperment of the breed of dog they are involved in.
6. Depending on the breed of dog, does NOT do same sex placements of male/male or female/female adoptions.
7. Prefers to adopt to homes with children at least over the age of 7 preferably (not many people can handle a puppy with a child under the age of 7)
8. Does a vet check, 3 reference checks, a 2 hour phone interview, and finally a home visit, where proof of ownership of the home is seen.. There the family/person/couple is grilled again, for at least an hour again on the breed they want to adopt.
9. Takes back any dog they adopted out no matter if the rescue is inactive or not.
10. has a GREAT adoption contract and has few to no returns.
11. Screens the adopters very well.
12. Places all rescue dogs spayed and neutered first, complete vaccinations were given, and the dog is given a clean bill of health from the rescue vet.
13. Tells the new owner to bring the dog to their own vet within 3 days.
14. Most reputable rescues are either 501C3, or working on getting to be nonprofit.. Non profit rescues NEVER make any money on their dogs.. For Profit rescues keep the profits and make money off the dogs..
15. A reputable rescue that takes donations will not split the donations among the members, the rescue will put the donations toward the vet bills incurred or toward a new dog coming into the program..
Last edited by Maryellen on May 17th, 2006, 3:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby cheekymunkee » May 17th, 2006, 3:43 pm

Fabulous topic MaryEllen! I am anxious to hear what everyone has to say on the subject. I have MY ideas as to what makes a reputable & a not so reputable rescue and I would like to see if others agree. I agree with your post 100% and anything less is unacceptable.
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Postby Maryellen » May 17th, 2006, 3:44 pm

crap i forgot to put what defines a non reputable rescue... fixing now...
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Postby Maryellen » May 17th, 2006, 3:51 pm

ok, i fixed it all.
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Postby cheekymunkee » May 17th, 2006, 4:30 pm

A reputable rescue KNOWS what areas are affected by BSL & NEVER travels through such areas with resticted dogs and NEVER even considers adopting a dog into a restriced area.
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Postby pocketpit » May 17th, 2006, 5:10 pm

Well you wanted input Cheeky so I'm going to list my 2 cents.
By ME's standards I guess I'm considered an unreputable rescue and I simply don't feel that it's true.

First of all I don't allow potential adopters to know where I live or any of our foster homes. I do this for saftey reasons and I won't change my policy and I'm glad I've followed through on this as we've had at least 2 incidences of disgruntled people who would have caused even more trouble had they had any clue where someone lived.

Secondly I'd ask for you to clarify your "living in stacked crates" sentence. I have a limited amount of space in my home and I do have several crates stacked on each other especially if I have fosters. My dogs however do not "live" in their crates. But they are used throughout the day and most everyone is crated at night.

And I do have more puppies in my home than adult dogs. Our foster program is severely limited on foster homes for dogs so I get most anything that comes into the program and with my dominant, can be dog aggro crew, puppies are easiest to live with. We do have adults from time to time but we take in puppies because it's what we can handle better with our current dogs.

I do adoptions on a case by case basis. Do I routinely adopt to renters? No, but if the applicant was outstanding and the circumstances right I would. My policies on adoption to certain folks or in certain situations largely depends on what breed I'm adopting out and the people I'm adopting to. For instance I'm leary of people with young children but I have adopted out to many families with good results becuase I screened them well enough to be comfortable with their intentions and abilities. I will not automatically discount them becuause their kid is under 7 years. While I will not adopt out Pit Bulls to other homes with Pit Bulls of the same sex, I have done adoptions to home with other breeds of the same sex. Of course once again we screen heavily and do a lot of work including further education to ensure that we are not putting our dogs into danger or endangering the current foster dog.

On the other hand we do vaccinate, spay/neuter everything as well as do any further needed vet care before adopting out. We also screen homes well (though I don't usually spend 2 hours on the phone with folks!) and have very few returns. We will take back any animal for any reason and at any time. We are also available at any time for advise, help or support. We are non profit (the offical paperwork is in the final stages) and monies are not split between anyone. It all goes back into the rescue to continue to pay for vet care.
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Postby cheekymunkee » May 17th, 2006, 5:24 pm

But, I don't think you have 10-15 personal dogs as well as fosters in crates only being brought out to potty. And when you have puppies, you do not have multiple litters & ONLY pull pregnant dogs leaving perfectly good non-pregnant dogs to die.

edit: and when your fosters have problems you don't tell them "too bad, not my problem, not my dog".
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Postby Maryellen » May 17th, 2006, 5:32 pm

pocket pit, i consider you a reputable rescue.. what you do is stellar in placing dogs.. you are not a hoarder, and you do not get over your head... and you do not have too many dogs that they almost never see the light of day

this thread is for everyones input, so please dont be offended by what i listed.
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Postby pocketpit » May 17th, 2006, 5:36 pm

I just wanted to clarify because I wasn't sure if it was posted in response to some recent posts I saw today or just because.

I'm glad people are okay with me because I like this forum :D
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Postby Maryellen » May 17th, 2006, 5:39 pm

dont worry, we all like you.. :D
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Postby a-bull » May 17th, 2006, 5:43 pm

As long as the dogs aren't left in crates side by side day in & day out, of course it's o.k. to crate fosters and others---particularly when dealing with pitbulls.

The crates should be the appropriate size, should be clean and warm, and the dogs should be taken out for regular excercise, attention and training. There should be age appropriate toys in the crates for entertainment/stimulation.

One thing I would like to add for foster folk---If you are managing pitties and they are developing dog aggression or cage crazies from being crated near other pitties, please make different arrangements for dogs experiencing such problems---crate them in their own room, kennel them in an appropriate outdoor kennel set-up, or relocate them to another foster who can spend more individualized time with them and work on training . . . otherwise you could be adopting out a 'pet' with a low likelihood of success, thus adding to the current 'pitbull problem.'
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My posts are my own opinions unless otherwise stated. They are not necessarily correct for all dogs or all owners.
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Postby cheekymunkee » May 17th, 2006, 5:45 pm

pocketpit wrote:I just wanted to clarify because I wasn't sure if it was posted in response to some recent posts I saw today or just because.

I'm glad people are okay with me because I like this forum :D


Response to posts such as this one

I can count at least 10 dogs that Eric has-and he admitted he works 8-5 and spends 2 hours a day after work at the site where he's building his house, and wakes up at 5:30 to check emails and update his site. Where do those dogs fit in there? My foster that came from him was VERY thin. She gained at least 5 lbs within a week of being there. You disgust me, Eric. And he dropped off a deaf dog, Ingi, at my house (because he had too many dogs and his parents were pissed about it), she was EXTREMELY food aggressive and dog aggressive and she was WILD. I guarantee you she gets no extra training or anything, and that sets up a new owner for serious failure when they aren't expecting that in a new puppy.


And if you EVER decide to leave I will be very, VERY upset!!
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Postby Marinepits » May 17th, 2006, 6:51 pm

a-bull wrote:As long as the dogs aren't left in crates side by side day in & day out, of course it's o.k. to crate fosters and others---particularly when dealing with pitbulls.

The crates should be the appropriate size, should be clean and warm, and the dogs should be taken out for regular excercise, attention and training. There should be age appropriate toys in the crates for entertainment/stimulation.

One thing I would like to add for foster folk---If you are managing pitties and they are developing dog aggression or cage crazies from being crated near other pitties, please make different arrangements for dogs experiencing such problems---crate them in their own room, kennel them in an appropriate outdoor kennel set-up, or relocate them to another foster who can spend more individualized time with them and work on training . . . otherwise you could be adopting out a 'pet' with a low likelihood of success, thus adding to the current 'pitbull problem.'


Excellent post! This can't be said often enough.
Never make someone a priority in your life when that someone treats you like an option.
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Postby pocketpit » May 17th, 2006, 7:22 pm

Response to posts such as this one

Quote:
I can count at least 10 dogs that Eric has-and he admitted he works 8-5 and spends 2 hours a day after work at the site where he's building his house, and wakes up at 5:30 to check emails and update his site. Where do those dogs fit in there? My foster that came from him was VERY thin. She gained at least 5 lbs within a week of being there. You disgust me, Eric. And he dropped off a deaf dog, Ingi, at my house (because he had too many dogs and his parents were pissed about it), she was EXTREMELY food aggressive and dog aggressive and she was WILD. I guarantee you she gets no extra training or anything, and that sets up a new owner for serious failure when they aren't expecting that in a new puppy.


Wow :o I obviously am missing out on a lot! I haven't had a chance to read through everything but I'm sure glad I don't have any involvement with that! What a rotten deal for everyone :evil:
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Postby a-bull » May 17th, 2006, 7:26 pm

Also, recommend appropriate training and/or assistance to adoptive homes, and if at all possible, provide adoptive families with a brochure of recommended trainers, websites, books, etc. for bully breeds.

I know many rescues that also operate as a hotline for their adoptive families, if problems arise, and I even know some that will assist with training. :thumbsup:
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