Anyone w/ experience w/Sewing Machines?

Everything that doesn't fit anywhere else!

Postby Malli » May 21st, 2011, 1:32 am

I've become interested in getting one. There are a lot of choices!

The one sales person I was talking to today said that the difference in price is the ease/or convenience of use, guards, speed control, locations of things, etc...
Is it really going to make a big difference?

I've had Pfaff and Janome recommended...
I can only please one person per day. Today is not your day, tomorrow doesn't look good either.
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Postby iluvk9 » May 21st, 2011, 6:11 am

Send a pm to Noel, Diana and Dee in case they don't see this. :wave2:
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Postby Hoyden » May 21st, 2011, 1:25 pm

Post the models and I'll tell you what I think. I spend a lot of time sewing, but I also end up fixing everyone else sewing machines because I just happen to be good at diagnosing problems and fixing stuff, so I've had my hands on a good number of machines.

SisMorphine has driven 2+ hours for me to clean, fix and show her how to use one of hers.
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She taking all the stars down from her sky to hang them up someplace new, where there's better weather and the sky's a different blue. ~ Autumn Fields
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Postby SisMorphine » May 21st, 2011, 1:29 pm

Yup what Noel said! She showed me how to take it apart and do some servicing myself (that one is a Singer from the 70's), which was nice because when I got my "new" one (a Kenmore from 1962) the first thing I did was take it apart and poke around. LOL! Unfortunately I have no clue how to fix alignment problems so I'll be dropping it off to get professionally serviced. Even though I can't use it yet, I am already in love with the Kenmore because it's solid metal and SOOOOO heavy duty that I'm not as worried that I'll break it with my inexperience behind the (sewing machine) pedal!
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
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Postby Malli » May 21st, 2011, 2:08 pm

I'm not really sure yet about the models...

That is part of my dilemma. I have been looking at new ones.

I will be sewing stuff for the house and curtains for our *many* windows, possibly a dog bed with batting and a dog sweater/jacket as well; so I don't think anything to hard on the machine...

The salesperson said the benefits of the higher priced models are better speed control, less likelyhood of the thread slipping out of the... "guide" on the arm before it goes in the needle, a more accessible bobbin, and I think a few other things that I have forgotten...
so are those things really that commonly an issue? There are WAY too many choices! :cuss:
I can only please one person per day. Today is not your day, tomorrow doesn't look good either.
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"You didn't know of the magical powers of the break stick? It's up there with genies and Harry Potter as far as magic levels go." SisMorphine 01/07/07
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Postby Hoyden » May 21st, 2011, 11:34 pm

When you look at the machines, take a picture of the model number with your phone. If they question you, simply tell them you want to look it up to make a pro/con list and won't remember the models if you don't take a picture or write it down.

How much do you really think you are going to sew?
Are you going to do more sewing than the things you listed above?
What kind of materials do you plan on sewing?
Do you want all those fancy stitches that some of the machines have on them?

Honestly? I don't even use most of them. In my opinion, these are essential stitches (because I use them the most) You also want the ability to reverse stitch.

- Straight stitch
- Reinforced straight stitch
- Stretch stitch
- Zigzag
- Overcast stitch
- Overlock stitch
- Flatlock
- Elastic blind hem
- Bridging stitch
- Satin stitch
- Bartack buttonhole
- Keyhole buttonhole

I take what ever sales people tell me with a grain of salt. They may know their product, but you may not like all the bells & whistles. Personally, I don't like too many because it's more crap to break on me and I am hard on my machines.

Personally, I'll buy a good high end used model before I buy another new machine. I've destroyed new machines because they were too fancy and had too many plastic parts and computerized crap in them. I have a computerized machine and one that has computerized features and I have more issues with the computerized one that was bought brand spanking new.

Check with places that fix sewing machines for what they may have in stock and let me know what the machines are and the price they are asking, I'll let you know if it is a fair price.
Moral courage is the most valuable and usually the most absent characteristic in men ~ General George S. Patton, Jr.

She taking all the stars down from her sky to hang them up someplace new, where there's better weather and the sky's a different blue. ~ Autumn Fields
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Postby SisMorphine » May 22nd, 2011, 1:53 am

Hoyden wrote:Check with places that fix sewing machines for what they may have in stock and let me know what the machines are and the price they are asking, I'll let you know if it is a fair price.

Personally my favorite price is FREE. LMAO!!

I have three sewing machines . . . 2 were free, and one was $60. The one I actually paid for is an antique Standard sewing machine from the 1800's. I keep looking at newer ones, but since I'm so (sew? GIGGLE) inexperienced I can't see wasting the money if I'm just going to break it. Ask friends and family, keep an eye on Freecycle and Craigslist. They show up. A lot.
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
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Postby Malli » May 22nd, 2011, 3:22 am

woop woop! My wicked-ass mother-in-law is going to give me hers; I don't know what brand it is(about 20 yrs old), but apparently unless what I'm sewing is really thick or dense, it will work well.

And if I decide I want something more, then I'll think about buying one; this is a much better way to go about this I think.

When I find out more about it I'll be sure to post it here :)
I can only please one person per day. Today is not your day, tomorrow doesn't look good either.
_______________________________________
"You didn't know of the magical powers of the break stick? It's up there with genies and Harry Potter as far as magic levels go." SisMorphine 01/07/07
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Postby SisMorphine » May 22nd, 2011, 6:51 pm

Yay good stuff :)
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
SisMorphine
They're like service dogs gone wrong.
 
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Location: PR

Postby airwalk » May 23rd, 2011, 10:00 pm

Malli, what a great solution. I was going to recommend getting a very basic used machine....try it out. Test it and see what you like and don't like...see what you sew. Sometimes as you get to sewing you find more things than you ever thought to sew, which may change your machine needs.

I have one very basic White that is my powerhouse. It is all metal, heavy as the dickens and goes forward, backward and sideways (zigzag) and that's it...but it goes through a ton.

I have a Baby Lock Ellure that is my embroidery machine and I love it because it has excellent speed control that the White doesn't have as much of. It is a much lighter weight machine and won't sew the really heavy stuff nearly as well.

You found the perfect starting point, good for you! Have fun, don't be afraid to try things. The worst you can do is have to throw it away and begin again. Usually you can pick it out and fix it....and after a bit you can rescue it by a small rework.
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