Video: Trainer saves dog with CPR

Food, Fitness and how to keep them healthy.

Postby madremissy » March 15th, 2011, 10:02 pm

CPR done on the dog after he collapsed after a seizure and stopped breathing.

I saw this on my EMS forum and thought it might be of interest to some. Of course this interests me because knowing what and why chest compressions are done, for someone who is not breathing, is amazing to me. To see this done for an animal who was not breathing is even more amazing to me.

*HARD TO WATCH and LISTEN TO WOMAN BE UPSET* at least it was for me. In my clinicals I have had to do chest compressions on a person and see a code done but I have never seen it done on an animal.

The video was recoreded so that the woman could show it to her vet when she took the dog in.

http://www.ems1.com/ems-heroes/articles/991094-Video-Trainer-saves-dog-with-CPR
User avatar
madremissy
I have a basketball and I'm not afraid to use it.
 
Posts: 3786
Location: meansville, ga

Postby SisMorphine » March 15th, 2011, 10:23 pm

Oh jeez. That made me cry. But I'm SUCH a weenie lately anyway ;)

It also really made me want to renew my Canine/Feline CPR. Thanks for the reminder <3
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
SisMorphine
They're like service dogs gone wrong.
 
Posts: 9231

Postby madremissy » March 15th, 2011, 10:37 pm

SisMorphine wrote:Oh jeez. That made me cry. But I'm SUCH a weenie lately anyway ;)

It also really made me want to renew my Canine/Feline CPR. Thanks for the reminder <3


I cried too. :oops: Sis, where can I go to learn about being certified for Canine/Feline CPR. I guess I can take what I learned at school and apply it, but it would be awsome to be certified in this also.
User avatar
madremissy
I have a basketball and I'm not afraid to use it.
 
Posts: 3786
Location: meansville, ga

Postby BigDogBuford » March 15th, 2011, 10:58 pm

We get certified every year at Roscoe's and it's super, super helpful. I've actually had to use CPR on a dog once. This vid was taken in Tacoma, WA I think or somewhere thereabouts.
~Jeanine

You never know when it will strike, but there comes a moment at work when you know that you just aren't going to do anything productive for the rest of the day.
User avatar
BigDogBuford
I love snipe hunts.
 
Posts: 2053
Location: Lake Stevens, WA

Postby plebayo » March 16th, 2011, 12:13 am

That was quick acting on his part that's for sure. Nothing can describe the moment you see a dog's eyes roll back in their head and they turn blue. It's nice to see a happy ending where this actually works, the times that I have seen CPR used [on patients that have crashed] it usually doesn't turn out so great. It's definitely something I think we should all learn to do, you just never know.
Suzanne
Seth, CGC & LiLo
♥♥Sofie - Always in my heart. ♥♥
User avatar
plebayo
Mrs. Dr. Kildare
 
Posts: 941
Location: Oregon

Postby pitbullmamaliz » March 16th, 2011, 1:18 am

The Red Cross offers a spectacular canine cpr/first aid class. It was really helpful to me and came with a book and DVD.

That is an amazing video. But I honestly can't help but wonder if his training methods caused it because at one point the woman says to the dog, "I'm so sorry." :(
"Remember - every time your dog gets somewhere on a tight leash *a fairy dies and it's all your fault.* Think of the fairies." http://www.positivepetzine.com"

http://www.pitbullzen.com
http://inaradog.wordpress.com
User avatar
pitbullmamaliz
Working out in the buff causes chafing
 
Posts: 15437
Location: Cleveland, OH

Postby SisMorphine » March 16th, 2011, 5:09 am

Like Jeanine said, check into local Red Cross classes. Also keep an eye on some of the local vet/boarding facilities as they often hold annual certification courses for a small fee.
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
SisMorphine
They're like service dogs gone wrong.
 
Posts: 9231

Postby SisMorphine » March 16th, 2011, 5:10 am

pitbullmamaliz wrote:That is an amazing video. But I honestly can't help but wonder if his training methods caused it because at one point the woman says to the dog, "I'm so sorry." :(

After having recently witnessed a dog go into a seizure due to a hard correction, that was actually the first thing that came to my mind as well :(
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
SisMorphine
They're like service dogs gone wrong.
 
Posts: 9231

Postby madremissy » March 16th, 2011, 6:44 am

SisMorphine wrote:Like Jeanine said, check into local Red Cross classes. Also keep an eye on some of the local vet/boarding facilities as they often hold annual certification courses for a small fee.


I am going to check with my AHA instructor today. My next clinical is at one of the firestations on an ambulance so I am going to check with some of the guys and see if they know. I have plenty of more clinicals to go and it would be nice to be able to be prepared at a scene for an animal in distress.
User avatar
madremissy
I have a basketball and I'm not afraid to use it.
 
Posts: 3786
Location: meansville, ga

Postby Maya815 » March 16th, 2011, 8:40 am

OMG that was heartwrenching! It brought tears to my eyes! Thank goodness someone knew what to do. I thing to do know. I have never seen it done before.
User avatar
Maya815
Just Whelped
 
Posts: 4
Location: Ohio

Postby TheRedQueen » March 16th, 2011, 9:45 am

SisMorphine wrote:
pitbullmamaliz wrote:That is an amazing video. But I honestly can't help but wonder if his training methods caused it because at one point the woman says to the dog, "I'm so sorry." :(

After having recently witnessed a dog go into a seizure due to a hard correction, that was actually the first thing that came to my mind as well :(


Me three...:(

Having lost a dog like this, it was awful for me to watch...just awful.
"I don't have any idea if my dogs respect me or not, but they're greedy and I have their stuff." -- Patty Ruzzo

"Dogs don't want to control people. They want to control their own lives." --John Bradshaw
User avatar
TheRedQueen
I thought I lost my Wiener... but then I found him.
 
Posts: 7184
Location: Maryland

Postby mnp13 » March 16th, 2011, 9:53 am

plebayo wrote:That was quick acting on his part that's for sure. Nothing can describe the moment you see a dog's eyes roll back in their head and they turn blue.


Happened in my kitchen two years ago. Riggs vs pig foot - pig foot almost won. I didn't have to do CPR, just the Heimlich though.
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
User avatar
mnp13
Evil Overlord
 
Posts: 17232
Location: Rochester, NY

Postby mnp13 » March 16th, 2011, 9:59 am

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nationa ... s/national

A veterinarian later determined Sugar suffers a heart condition and must refrain from strenuous activity.
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
User avatar
mnp13
Evil Overlord
 
Posts: 17232
Location: Rochester, NY

Postby PetieMarie22 » March 16th, 2011, 10:04 am

I recently took the Red Cross Pet CPR class and this just makes me want to go refresh myself! The class I took also taught you how to prepare for your pet in case of a disaster. Which may come in handy the way this planet is right now!
Kathleen (and George)
Petie Marie - spoiled rotten Pit Bull Terrier
Sunshine Honeysuckle Smith - DSH cat that lives under the couch
Sasha Marie - Bombay Mix = DIVA
User avatar
PetieMarie22
Hyper Adolescent Bully
 
Posts: 270
Location: Rochester NY

Postby plebayo » March 16th, 2011, 10:05 am

pitbullmamaliz wrote:That is an amazing video. But I honestly can't help but wonder if his training methods caused it because at one point the woman says to the dog, "I'm so sorry." :(


They said the dog had a heart problem [shocking, it's a boxer]. Any kind of stress could have caused this to happen be it a correction or the dog just being hyper on its own.
Suzanne
Seth, CGC & LiLo
♥♥Sofie - Always in my heart. ♥♥
User avatar
plebayo
Mrs. Dr. Kildare
 
Posts: 941
Location: Oregon

Postby LMM » March 16th, 2011, 11:03 am

For anyone located in Rochester we routinely hold an Animal First Aid class that covers CPR fully at Tails of Success.
User avatar
LMM
I'll Kick Your Ass
 
Posts: 1834
Location: Bitch please....

Postby mnp13 » March 16th, 2011, 12:31 pm

LMM wrote:For anyone located in Rochester we routinely hold an Animal First Aid class that covers CPR fully at Tails of Success.


Please post the next one!
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
User avatar
mnp13
Evil Overlord
 
Posts: 17232
Location: Rochester, NY

Postby BigDogBuford » March 16th, 2011, 1:03 pm

I've seen a Boxer drop dead mid-bark from cardiomyopothy so it can happen literally at any time.
~Jeanine

You never know when it will strike, but there comes a moment at work when you know that you just aren't going to do anything productive for the rest of the day.
User avatar
BigDogBuford
I love snipe hunts.
 
Posts: 2053
Location: Lake Stevens, WA

Postby HappyPuppy » March 17th, 2011, 7:47 pm

Gosh - she was just a little hysterical!?! :shock: Well done for the person who actually took action!!!
Ruby Underfoot, CGC
User avatar
HappyPuppy
Supremely Bully
 
Posts: 1019
Location: Costa Mesa, CA

Postby plebayo » March 17th, 2011, 9:11 pm

HappyPuppy wrote:Gosh - she was just a little hysterical!?!


It's kind of hard not to... when my cat stopped breathing while sedated I would have completely lost it but my sister grabbed me and told me to grab a catheter and hold a leg off for her which definitely helped me focus. It's really hard not to fall to pieces especially when you either don't know what to do or you can't do anything.

Obviously the trainer had some knowledge of what to try/do to help. And good for him for being able to focus with all of the adrenaline going. It's really hard sometimes to regain your composure in a stressful situation. When I had a dog crash on me at work I raced to the phone to call one of the vets I work with and I was freaking out trying to read the phone numbers on our employee list, I had to take a deep breath, remind myself that I can only dial as fast as I can read, read the numbers, and then dial. I always hope I will be able to 'think' in stressful situations, but it's a lot harder when the situation is actually happening.
Suzanne
Seth, CGC & LiLo
♥♥Sofie - Always in my heart. ♥♥
User avatar
plebayo
Mrs. Dr. Kildare
 
Posts: 941
Location: Oregon


Return to Nutrition & Health

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users