simpleLEASH

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Postby pitbullmamaliz » January 31st, 2011, 11:44 am

Just what the world needs - a leash that triggers a shock collar so you don't have to learn how to train your dog!

http://www.simpleleash.com/catalog/home ... s9qkodmv62

How Does the simpleLEASH® Work?

simpleLEASH® training is quick, simple and safe. Your dog is smart. A long time ago a very insightful man name named Pavlov realized that a dog that hears a beep before getting food learns very quickly what the beep means. simpleLEASH® does the same thing.

When your dog pulls, he will hear the beep that says, "You're pulling too hard!" If he keeps pulling, he will feel a safe but uncomfortable correction stimulus. Very quickly dogs learn to stop pulling when they hear the beep, and don't receive any further correction stimulus.

simpleLEASH® training is simple. The computer inside knows when to give your dog the beep and also the correction stimulus, so training becomes predictable and easy. You literally don't do a thing except hold the end of the leash. It can easily be adjusted for dogs and owners of any size or temperament.

Training will typically take one or two walks. During training, your dog will likely receive a few harmless, but effective, correction stimuli. Your pet controls the administration of the stimulus by how hard it pulls. After this training, dogs typically stop pulling when they hear the warning beep, avoiding any further correction stimuli. The simpleLEASH® really is that simple and effective. No wonder owners have described the leash as "unbelievable" and "brilliant."
"Remember - every time your dog gets somewhere on a tight leash *a fairy dies and it's all your fault.* Think of the fairies." http://www.positivepetzine.com"

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Postby plebayo » January 31st, 2011, 11:49 am

I love the whole "harmless but effective stimuli".

I don't know, more and more things are being invented that pretty much allows the dog owner to not actually train their dog.

You could zap the crap out of your dog, or you could just teach them not to pull when on leash.
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Postby mnp13 » January 31st, 2011, 11:50 am

What's the difference between this and invisible fence?? Warning tone, then correction.

They learn the tension that produces the warning tone, then the tension that gives the correction... and then learn that tension is a bad thing.

Actually, I was just thinking about a leash like this last night. lol

And honestly, it's not much different than the "turn and correct" thing for leash manners, so I'd be a total hypocrite if I said anything against it.

However, I DO take issue with the "harmless but effective" BS. Corrections hurt, that's why they work. No, they don't truly harm as in injure, but they still hurt for heaven's sake.
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Postby mnp13 » January 31st, 2011, 11:52 am

and this is just plain crap... and their "out" for the whole setup.
When to Use the simpleLEASH®?
The simpleLEASH® is Not a Substitute for Positive Reinforcement Training

Here at the simpleLEASH company we firmly believe in positive reinforcement training. Whenever we get a new dog, we always take them to professional dog obedience classes. We have found this training is very effective for most dogs.

However, some dogs just do not respond to this training. They just keep on pulling. For many dog owners, especially mothers and elderly, this can make dog walking difficult and often unsafe. The simpleLEASH® works where other methods fail. It is a safe, quick, and effective way to stop pulling.


Frankly though, I'd use this before a head collar - if you're just talking about "magic ways to stop your dog from pulling" (which I don't like no matter what.)
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Postby plebayo » January 31st, 2011, 12:11 pm

You could just put a shock collar on a dog and zap it every time it pulls. :|

I definitely agree a correction is a correction. I'm not anti-shocking the dog I just think people should learn how to give a proper correction and teach the dog how to walk on leash themselves instead of having a leash do it for them. The leash IMO encourages a person to do less research. You know half of the people buying this thing probably can't even teach their dog to sit and aren't going to research it.
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Postby amalie79 » January 31st, 2011, 12:13 pm

"Your dog is smart"-- but not smarter than the leash!

It's not only "unbelievable," but also "brilliant." Put that in your pipe and smoke it, Dog!

And come to think of it, I think that also means the leash is smarter than the human!
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Postby mnp13 » January 31st, 2011, 12:15 pm

plebayo wrote:You could just put a shock collar on a dog and zap it every time it pulls. :|

Not really, because the consistency wouldn't be there. In the timing or the tension.

I definitely agree a correction is a correction. I'm not anti-shocking the dog I just think people should learn how to give a proper correction and teach the dog how to walk on leash themselves instead of having a leash do it for them. The leash IMO encourages a person to do less research. You know half of the people buying this thing probably can't even teach their dog to sit and aren't going to research it.

I agree 100% but that's what I say about haltis, GL's, easy walk harnesses, and all the other "magic" things that people slap on their dogs and have sudden behavior changes.
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Postby copperlegend » January 31st, 2011, 12:58 pm

No training, collars or leashes would stop our dogs from pulling.


I'm sorry, but if absolutely no other solution worked... they clearly weren't trying hard enough.
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » January 31st, 2011, 1:11 pm

It's not any different from an Invisible Fence. I don't like those either. I've seen the psychological damage those collars have done to dogs.
"Remember - every time your dog gets somewhere on a tight leash *a fairy dies and it's all your fault.* Think of the fairies." http://www.positivepetzine.com"

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Postby mnp13 » January 31st, 2011, 1:15 pm

copperlegend wrote:
No training, collars or leashes would stop our dogs from pulling.


I'm sorry, but if absolutely no other solution worked... they clearly weren't trying hard enough.


agreed.
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Postby TheRedQueen » January 31st, 2011, 7:03 pm

Just pair this up with the magic doggy remote, and you'd be all set!
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Postby tiva » January 31st, 2011, 9:40 pm

It may sound ridiculous to us, but by definition (almost), if we're hanging out on dog discussion forums, we're dog nerds. Most people aren't. A lot of dogs end up in shelters because their owners haven't figured out how to walk them on a leash. If this goofy tool keeps some of those dogs alive, I'm all for it.

Of course, in an ideal world, all owners with impulsive, strong, rowdy dogs would devote themselves to clicker training and eventually get their dogs walking politely on leash. But all owners aren't that way, heaven knows.

The simpleLeash website notes: "You will be surprised at how quickly your dog learns when the feedback is predictable and consistent." I think that's the key issue here. Few people are predictable and consistent in their training. If the simpleleash can communicate with the dog better than the average owner manages to communicate, that's a good thing.

After reading the website, I'm beginning to think this may be a GREAT idea, if it keeps people from buying other forms of correction collars that are a lot easier to abuse. This simpleLeash, for example, does have variable stimulus levels. But the default is set to the lowest, and to change that level, you've got to mess with opening up the battery compartment and fussing about with switches. Most people will never bother, I bet.

My main objection to regular e-collars is that it's SO easy to whack the dog on high stim, that most people who buy them never learn to use them correctly--ie, on very low stim with consistent, predictable feedback.

I've wanted someone to sell an e-collar that is difficult to use on anything but very low levels. This simpleLeash might be pretty durn close.
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