Training Videos

Weight pull, Protection, Agility, Flyball... you name it!

Postby furever_pit » February 2nd, 2010, 6:53 pm

I got some video on Sunday while we were at training and thought I would share it here.

Dylan:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnxSzFpCZkA

Gator:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijlVhWGk ... re=channel

Constructive criticism is welcome! I know that my handling skills leave a little to be desired -- mostly cause I am kinda clumsy when dealing with too much equipment.

Thanks for looking. :)
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » February 2nd, 2010, 7:09 pm

How come the decoy has 2 leads on Dylan and is correcting him?
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Postby pocketpit » February 2nd, 2010, 7:21 pm

Dylan obviously enjoys himself! It's nice to see his enthusiasm for working :D
I will say that I was suprised to see that the one time Dylan offered an out on his name the first time and immediately offered the couche/guard his decoy rather than instantly rewarding that behavior actually just walked away from him. I was confused as to why because it looked like that is what you are attempting to teach him. Any time one of my dogs slips the bite or misses because they are lazy or distracted we do a lot of teasing and agitation and then put them away or have the decoy remove themselves temporarily from sight. I don't know Dylan though so maybe feeding him another bite is the right route for him. It's often easy to armchair coach but things can be much different in real life, so not being there and understanding your training plan may twist my perception of the video.
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Postby furever_pit » February 2nd, 2010, 7:29 pm

pitbullmamaliz wrote:How come the decoy has 2 leads on Dylan and is correcting him?


From what I have seen, it is common practice for the FR training decoy to have a hand in correcting the dog and teaching the exercises. It was a little weird for me at first because I am used to Sch where I was the only person ever giving Dylan corrections and I was the only person he was expected to listen to. However, I have found the 'training triangle' in FR to be very helpful as I learn more about handling my own dog, reading the dog, and understanding the decoy's role.

The 2 leads are used so that when corrected for the down/guard that Dylan can be kept centered. If you correct to one side Dylan will stray to that side of the decoy and we need him to stay directly in front.
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Postby furever_pit » February 2nd, 2010, 7:31 pm

pocketpit - I see where you are referring to. I will keep my eye on this next week and talk to my trainer about it.

Thanks.
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » February 2nd, 2010, 8:36 pm

Thanks for explaining! That makes sense about the 2 leads. Gator was cracking me up - those long long legs bouncing around! He looks good though!
"Remember - every time your dog gets somewhere on a tight leash *a fairy dies and it's all your fault.* Think of the fairies." http://www.positivepetzine.com"

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Postby furever_pit » February 2nd, 2010, 10:41 pm

pocketpit wrote:Dylan obviously enjoys himself! It's nice to see his enthusiasm for working :D
I will say that I was suprised to see that the one time Dylan offered an out on his name the first time and immediately offered the couche/guard his decoy rather than instantly rewarding that behavior actually just walked away from him. I was confused as to why because it looked like that is what you are attempting to teach him. Any time one of my dogs slips the bite or misses because they are lazy or distracted we do a lot of teasing and agitation and then put them away or have the decoy remove themselves temporarily from sight. I don't know Dylan though so maybe feeding him another bite is the right route for him. It's often easy to armchair coach but things can be much different in real life, so not being there and understanding your training plan may twist my perception of the video.


I have been thinking about this portion of your post and I haven't talked to my trainer about it yet, so bear with me.

Dylan is a dog that gets hectic when he goes into over-the-top drive. So part of what we are working on with him is keeping him at a point where the wheels in his brain are still turning and he can actually learn. I'm wondering if maybe agitating him and then not rewarding him with a bite would be counterproductive to what we are trying to do?
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Postby pocketpit » February 3rd, 2010, 5:44 pm

I have been thinking about this portion of your post and I haven't talked to my trainer about it yet, so bear with me.

Dylan is a dog that gets hectic when he goes into over-the-top drive. So part of what we are working on with him is keeping him at a point where the wheels in his brain are still turning and he can actually learn. I'm wondering if maybe agitating him and then not rewarding him with a bite would be counterproductive to what we are trying to do?


I can understand and appreciate that but my fear would be that given too many sessions where he releases his grip and then is given another opportunity without having to work for it, he'll learn bad habits. My concern would be that he'll be slow to re engage when he loses his grip and a bite is not easily offered to him. I've seen quite a few dogs that have this issue then get frustrated and end up giving up all together. Again, I'm not there and I don't know Dylan so this may not apply to him. It's simply my reason for saying what I did.
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Postby furever_pit » February 3rd, 2010, 6:20 pm

I understand your concerns and will be talking to my trainer about it. Even for me, watching this video opens my eyes to errors in handling and training. That's part of the reason I do them. I wasn't trying to make excuses for the training method in the video, just trying to think through it on my own. When I see my trainer this weekend I will ask him about it, and I will let you know what his thoughts are.

Thanks for your input! I really do appreciate the insight and the opportunity for me to learn and to recognize these issues in my training.
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Postby pocketpit » February 3rd, 2010, 8:08 pm

I wold be interested in hearing what he has to say. It's always good to have another set of eyes to point out the good and the bad, I always try to video my sessions when I can so I can see what I can do better. It's just way to hard to catch everything when it's happening.
Hopefully Katrina will chime in with her thoughts.
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Postby furever_pit » February 7th, 2010, 5:31 pm

We trained today so I wanted to come back to this thread and update it.

pocketpit wrote:I can understand and appreciate that but my fear would be that given too many sessions where he releases his grip and then is given another opportunity without having to work for it, he'll learn bad habits. My concern would be that he'll be slow to re engage when he loses his grip and a bite is not easily offered to him. I've seen quite a few dogs that have this issue then get frustrated and end up giving up all together. Again, I'm not there and I don't know Dylan so this may not apply to him. It's simply my reason for saying what I did.


We took Dylan off of the bungee today and let him run into the decoy for the bite. We did this a few times. Our decoy knows Dylan's weakness and made Dylan miss a bite and I saw no hesitation on Dylan's part to come back to get the bite. I actually see what I have been building in Dylan with the flirtpole (as my trainer had me do it) - I make Dylan miss repeatedly and give him the bite when he makes a solid push of effort. This is what he was doing in the bitework today.

Our plan is to start putting Dylan on a 50 foot bungee for the run-in attacks.

ETA: Dylan bit the suit for the first time today! YAY! :dance:
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Postby pocketpit » February 7th, 2010, 5:43 pm

We took Dylan off of the bungee today and let him run into the decoy for the bite. We did this a few times. Our decoy knows Dylan's weakness and made Dylan miss a bite and I saw no hesitation on Dylan's part to come back to get the bite. I actually see what I have been building in Dylan with the flirtpole (as my trainer had me do it) - I make Dylan miss repeatedly and give him the bite when he makes a solid push of effort. This is what he was doing in the bitework today.

Our plan is to start putting Dylan on a 50 foot bungee for the run-in attacks.


Good work! That exciting, I know how exhilirating it can be when you get to take that next big step forward and see things work. The technique you described above is definately a good motivational tool and one we use with a long bungee. It's a great tool for teaching pivot leg work as well.
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Postby katiek0417 » February 8th, 2010, 11:53 am

pocketpit wrote:
We took Dylan off of the bungee today and let him run into the decoy for the bite. We did this a few times. Our decoy knows Dylan's weakness and made Dylan miss a bite and I saw no hesitation on Dylan's part to come back to get the bite. I actually see what I have been building in Dylan with the flirtpole (as my trainer had me do it) - I make Dylan miss repeatedly and give him the bite when he makes a solid push of effort. This is what he was doing in the bitework today.

Our plan is to start putting Dylan on a 50 foot bungee for the run-in attacks.


Good work! That exciting, I know how exhilirating it can be when you get to take that next big step forward and see things work. The technique you described above is definately a good motivational tool and one we use with a long bungee. It's a great tool for teaching pivot leg work as well.


Bungees are great for getting dogs to come in nice and fast...I've also seen people have their dogs drag tires...
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