Additional supplements w/RAW diet?

Postby amazincc » August 18th, 2007, 4:18 pm

What should I include? There is so much info and contradicting advise out there... one site says "vegetables/fish oil/flax seeds/whatever are good", another says "absolutely not"... Mick only gets meat (chicken, turkey, pork, beef) and an occasional egg right now... what should I add, if anything?

Also... do you guys count the weight of the bones into the daily portion... or just the actual "meat"?
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Postby ellie@ny » August 18th, 2007, 6:28 pm

This is a great site about RAW feeding. Supplements

http://www.leatherneckk9s.com/

Honestly I never count-weight the meat what I fed with the dogs,you learn by the time how much your dog will need IMO.
You just look at them,if they're getting chubby,cut the food back etc.
:|
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Postby amazincc » August 18th, 2007, 7:14 pm

Thanks for the link, Ellie... and a "Red-nose" one at that! :wink:

I was more asking for personal opinions though, since I scoured the Internet... and found lots of conflicting info... :|
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Postby cheekymunkee » August 18th, 2007, 10:11 pm

I add kelp, olive oil, yogurt, cottage cheese. chopped garlic occasionally (flea season) organ meat and give a meal of fish once per week or so. I weigh ( eyeball ) the whole meal, not just the meat.
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Postby amazincc » August 18th, 2007, 11:13 pm

Thanks, Cheeky... how much and how often do you add what? :oops:
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Postby cheekymunkee » August 18th, 2007, 11:33 pm

a sprinkle of kelp, tablespoon of the others a few times a week. organ meat can be rich but mine are used to it now so their whole meal for that day will be liver or kidney along with an egg. fish is a whole meal too.
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Postby amazincc » August 18th, 2007, 11:37 pm

Thanks... :)
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Postby ellie@ny » August 19th, 2007, 8:56 am

Hi Christine,sorry I wasn't too specific...
What I meant with my post is actually,it's really up to you what do you supplement with your dog.Everybody different.
The first thing is I think you have to look up all the supplements,and understand why is it good for your dog.
I supplement daily with Glucosamine,ACV,Kelp,Vitamine C,E,B12 etc,Kefir,fish oil,sometimes eggs,and whatever veggies I have,lately I'm using baby food...all natural WO anything.

Here are some supplements and veggies descriptions for you:

VEGETABLES
Dogs have actually eaten vegetables the whole period of their evolution, and that's a long time! As such, vegetables, particularly green leafy vegetables should form part of the domestic dog's diet. Dogs need vegetables because they contain many important health promoting nutrients. The fiber your dog obtains from raw vegetables includes both soluble and insoluble fiber. Vegetables supply many other nutrients. Many of those nutrients are the ones that have been found to be in short supply in the modern dog's "civilized" diet. This includes difficult to obtain omega 3 essential fatty acids, most of a dog's vitamin needs, masses of enzymes and various anti-aging factors, including antioxidants and phytochemicals.

Broccoli
Broccoli is one of the most nutrient dense foods. It is dense in vitamin C, beta carotene, folic acid, calcium and fiber. It is also a good source of chromium. Like other members of the cabbage family, broccoli has demonstrated remarkable anticancer effects. Broccoli contains several important phytochemicals: beta carotene, indoles, and isothiocyanates and over thirty-three cancer preventative compounds. Research suggests that phytochemicals prevent carcinogens from forming, stop carcinogens from getting to target cells and boost enzymes that detoxify carcinogens.

Spinach
Spinach contains twice as much iron as most other greens. Like other chlorophyll and carotene -containing vegetables, it is a rich source of antioxidants. Besides beta-carotene, it also supplies two other carotenes, lutein and zeaxanthin. Spinach has long had a reputation of being very high in nutrients. It is a good source of fiber, calcium, potassium and vitamins A, B6 and K.

Celery

Celery is rich in calcium, potassium, phosphorus, sodium and iron, as well as vitamins A, B, C. The phytochemical 3-n-butyl phthalide, one of the components that gives celery its characteristic smell and taste, is especially potent as an anti-tumor agent. Along with the compound sedanolide, an aromatic ingredient also found in celery, 3-n-butyl phthalide significantly reduces the incidence of tumors in laboratory animals. It is said to decrease nervousness, and is used as an acid neutralizer.

Bok Choy
A cruciferous vegetable like cabbage, bok choy is an excellent source of Beta carotene, vitamin C, thiamine, riboflavin and calcium. It contains significant amounts of nitrogen compounds known as indoles, as well as fiber - both of which appear to lower the risk of various forms of cancer. Bok choy is also a good source of folate (folic acid).

Carrot

The carrot is the king of the vegetables. It is the richest source of pro-vitamin A carotenes among commonly consumed vegetables. But unlike vitamin A, beta carotene and other carotenes in carrots do not cause toxicity. Beta carotene is also a powerful antioxidant. Carrots also contain vitamins B, C, D, E, K, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, sodium, and iron. Carrots have repeatedly shown to nourish the optic nerve and significantly improve eyesight.


Capsicum

This is an excellent source of many essential nutrients. By weight, red peppers have three times as much vitamin C as citrus fruit. Moreover, red peppers are quite a good source of beta carotene, and they offer a good amount of fiber and vitamin B6. Because capsicum stimulates circulation and enhances blood flow, it is considered food for the circulatory system and as a digestive aid. Red peppers are one of few foods that contain lycopene, a phytochemical that may help prevent various forms of cancer.

FRUIT
Yes, dogs can and do eat fruit. Wild dogs - domestic dogs, they all do it! Remember dogs are omnivores. They can eat almost anything. Fruits are mostly water. After that, the major nutrient in fruit is soluble carbohydrate. That is simple sugars. Energy foods. Fruit contains lots of fiber. It also contains vitamins, enzymes and antioxidants. Because fruit is a whole food, it also contains minerals, small amounts of protein and small amounts of fat. Two nutrients present in most raw fruits, vitamin A as carotene and vitamin C, make fruit a valuable food for your dog. The enzymes present in raw fruit, also make it important as part of your dog's diet, particularly if your dog is past middle age and showing the beginnings of degenerative disease.

Is it essential that dogs eat fruit?
No. All of the nutrients present in fruit can be obtained from other sources. However, by adding fruit to the diet, we ensure a wide variety of foods. This gives the greatest chance of providing a balanced diet with plenty of longevity and immune system promoting nutrients. Any fruit can be fed to dogs, however tropical fruits are a particularly valuable food as they contain lots of antioxidants. Scientists have discovered that the enzymes and antioxidants present in fruit, many of which have not yet been identified, keep the skin and indeed the whole body free of degeneration and old age diseases.

Whole Apple
Unpeeled apples are especially high in non-pro-vitamin A carotenes and pectin. Pectin is a remarkable type of fiber that has been shown to exert a number of beneficial effects. Due to its gel forming fiber, it can improve the intestinal muscle's ability to push waste through the gastrointestinal tract. Pectin also binds to and eliminates toxins in the gut. Apples are also rich in beta carotene and vitamin C as well as several B complex vitamins including vitamin B6, folic acid and lots of potassium.

Whole Pear
Pears are an excellent source of water-soluble fiber, including pectin, which makes them useful in toning the intestines. Fresh pears contain potassium which is necessary for maintaining heartbeat, muscle contraction, nerve transmission, and carbohydrate metabolism. Pears also contain Vitamin C. An important antioxidant, Vitamin C is essential for helping prevent free radical damage.

Whole Grapefruit
Grapefruit is a good source of flavonoids, water soluble fibers, potassium, vitamin C, and folic acid. Grapefruit, like other citrus fruits has been shown to exert some anticancer effects in both human and animal studies. Grapefruit pectin has been shown to possess similar cholesterol lowering action to other fruit pectins. The whole fruit contains more pectin than the juice. Recently, grapefruit has been shown to normalize hematocrit levels. The word hematocrit refers to the percentage of red blood cells per volume of blood. Low hematocrit levels usually reflect anemia. High hematocrit levels may reflect severe dehydration or an increased number of red blood cells. Grapefruit seeds are well known as an anti-fungal agent in that their consumption kills many different types of parasites and assists the body in producing beneficial bacteria. A biologically active natural ingredient found in the seeds kills strep, staph, salmonella, e.coli, candida, herpes, influenza, parasites, fungi and traveler's diarrhea, and is used as an antibiotic, anti fungal, antiprotozoan and antiviral.

Whole Orange
Everyone knows that oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C, but they have more to offer nutritionally than just this nutrient. One orange contains generous levels of folate (folic acid), potassium, and thiamin, as well as some calcium and magnesium. Equally important to the nutritional value of oranges is their supply of flavonoids, making oranges a valuable aid in strengthening the immune system, supporting connective tissues, and promoting overall good health. Oranges have been shown to protect against cancer, and fight viral infections.

WHOLE EGG
Eggs are absolutely brilliant nutrition for your dog. Eggs are a whole food, and often regarded as having the perfect protein. It is the one against which all other proteins are measured. Eggs contain a full compliment of minerals, including excellent levels of calcium (mostly in the yolk), all the vitamins except vitamin C and a range of high quality saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, the nutrient lecithin and the whole range of enzymes and other longevity factors always present in raw foods. The shell is included as a further source of calcium. Egg yolks are an essential food for a dog with skin problems. They contain sulphur containing amino acids, biotin, vitamin A, essential fatty acids and zinc.

FLAX SEED
Flaxseed has been used for more than 10,000 years. The oil of the seed is a rich source of Essential Fatty Acids. Essential Fats, or Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) are essential nutrients that the body can't produce itself. The only way to obtain these nutrients is through diet. EFAs are polyunsaturated fats, which are considered "good" fats. EFAs contribute to the healthy functioning of cell membranes, and are also critical for the synthesis of eicosanoids, a family of hormone-like substances that help in cell maintenance on a minute-to-minute basis. Just like other essential vitamins and minerals, EFAs are necessary for good health.

Flaxseed contains bioactive compounds called lignans, which have been proven to prevent cancer. Once consumed, lignans found in flaxseed are converted by bacterial action in the colon to mammalian lignans. They are then circulated through the intestinal tract and liver where their action is potentiated. In the body, mammalian lignans have estrogen-like and anti-estrogen effects. Scientists believe the effects of lignans on estrogen metabolism, in addition to their antioxidant properties, may explain why diets rich in lignans have a lower incidence of cancer. Evidence suggests that lignans may also be antioxidants, although the strength of their antioxidant activity is not yet clear. Other studies indicate flax lignans reduce cholesterol and prevent diabetes in animals. So far, scientists have isolated at least three flaxseed components with potential health benefits. The first is fiber, valuable for intestinal health. The benefits of the other two substances, alpha-linolenic acid (a type of omega-3 fatty acid) and lignans, suggests that these components may be helpful in prevention of heart disease and perhaps in treatment of chronic kidney disease.

GARLIC
Garlic is nature's antibiotic. There is no doubt that garlic does confer some health advantages. Garlic has been found to have effective antimicrobial properties, inhibiting the growth of both bacteria and fungi. Garlic helps stabilize blood pressure and gives a good solid boost to the immune system, keeping at bay infections of various sorts particularly upper respiratory tract infections. Much of it's success is due to various compounds of sulphur. Garlic is a health building and disease preventing herb. It is rich in potassium, zinc, vitamins A and C, and selenium. It also contains calcium, manganese, copper, vitamin B1 and some iron.

KELP
Kelp contains over 60 minerals and elements, 21 amino acids and simple and complex carbohydrates, which promotes glandular health, especially the pituitary, adrenal and thyroid glands. Kelp supplies a natural source of iodine and acts as an antibiotic to kill germs.

ALFALFA
Alfalfa helps the body assimilate protein, calcium and other nutrients. This herb is a body cleanser, infection fighter and natural deodorizer. It is the richest land source of trace minerals and contains vitamins A, C, E, K, B and D. Alfalfa also contains bioflavonoids, and eight digestive enzymes to promote proper assimilation of foods.

KEFIR
The history of kefir is centuries old. The word "kefir" is said to have originated from the word "keif" which means" good feeling". Kefir is like yogurt, but with a greater variety of cultures and significant health benefits. Unlike yogurt, which typically contains only two or three different bacteria, true kefir contains a greater range of different microorganisms, each with its own unique contribution. This is what separates kefir from all other cultured milk products. Kefir is made by fermentation of "kefir" grains, which resemble minute cauliflowers. The grains consist of casein and colonies of microorganisms that are grown together symbiotically. Kefir can only be made from pre-existing grains.

The cultured kefir added to Dr. Billinghurst's BARF DIETâ„¢ processes antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of gram positive and gram negative bacteria, helping to eliminate destructive pathogenic yeast and internal parasites. The cultured kefir in Dr. Billinghurst's BARF DIETâ„¢ also contains a unique extract of colostrum. All mammals produce colostrum, sometimes called "first milk" or "foremilk". Research has shown that concentrated forms of colostrum are able to block the effects of harmful pathogens and aid in the maintenance of a healthy intestinal tract. Colostrum also contains other nonspecific immune factors including lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase, which help control pathogens or harmful bacteria. These natural immune components can recognize and resist multiple species of common bacteria such as E. coli, Staphylococci, Streptococci, Klebsiella, Enterococci, Pseudomonas, Clostridium Difficile, and Cryptosporidium.

Kefir is considered to be one of the richest sources of enzymes. It plays a vital role in the development of a healthy digestive tract and helps improve the immune system. Kefir contains minerals and essential amino acids, an abundance of calcium and magnesium. Rich in vitamin B1, B12, calcium, amino acids, folic acid and vitamin K, it is an excellent source of biotin which aids the body's assimilation of other B vitamins. Other benefits include bowel regularity and decreased lactose intolerance. Evidence shows that the appropriate strains of lactic acid bacteria in fermented milk products can alleviate symptoms of lactose intolerance by providing bacterial lactase to the intestine and stomach. Kefir is recommended to restore intestinal flora while recovering from illness or when being treated with antibiotics. It eliminates unwanted toxins and pollutants in the body, just like antioxidants do with free radicals. Kefir enjoys a rich tradition of health claims and is known around the world for its preventative characteristics

And about Apple Cider Vinegar,the list is way too long please google it and you will see it why is the best for you dog! :)

Hope I helped this time!
Ellie
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Postby cheekymunkee » August 19th, 2007, 11:43 am

Thanks for that Ellie! I need to start adding vitamin c.
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Postby amazincc » August 19th, 2007, 2:54 pm

Oh, wow, Ellie... THANK YOU!!! I printed this out and will start adding stuff... :)
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Postby ellie@ny » August 19th, 2007, 4:15 pm

On August 19 2007, amazincc wrote:Oh, wow, Ellie... THANK YOU!!! I printed this out and will start adding stuff... :)


Your Welcome! :) Some more...

Vitamin and herb suggestions for medium size dogs:

Vitamin E

-Description: A fat soluble vitamin which can be found in wheat germ oil and other sources such as asparagus, avocados, berries, green leafy vegetables, and tomatoes.

-Properties: Acts as an antioxidant and protects against damage to cell membranes. A diet high in vitamin E can have a protective effect in many diseases including heart disease, cancer, strokes, viral infections.

-Actions: It is a potent antioxidant and reduces fat oxidation and increases the production of HDL cholesterol. At higher doses, it reduces cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase activities which decreases production of prostaglandins and leukotreines. Thus, it acts as a potent anti-inflammatory drug.

-Cautions: It will reduce platelet function and prolong the bleeding time slightly in healthy individuals. There is no known side-effects to vitamin E at levels less than 4000-6000 IU per day (except in cats, where levels greater than 100 IU/day can create hepatolipidosis).

-Dose: Vitamin E is well tolerated even at high doses.

Vitamin C

-Description: A water soluble vitamin that can be found in citrus fruit, broccoli, peppers, and other vegetables. Vitamin C can be synthesized by most animal species except primates, guinea-pigs, fruit bats and some fish. These animals require it in their diet.

-Action: Vitamin C is important in the manufacture of collagen. It is needed to convert the amino acid proline to hydroxyproline which makes up part of the collagen structure. Collagen is an important component of connective tissue, tendons, cartilage.

-Properties: Acts as an antioxidant and important in collagen metabolism and immune function. Vitamin C works with vitamin E and helps regenerate vitamin E, potentiating its antioxidant effect.

-Uses: It has been used to boost immunity, enhance wound repair, reduce risk of cataracts.

-Cautions: As a water soluble vitamin, any exess vitamin C is lost readily in the urine. Daily supplementation may be warrented in animals under stress or disease, especially in those animals that do not make vitamin C within their bodies. It is important that flavanoids be administered at the same time as supplemental ascorbic acid.

-Side Effects: Excessive doses of vitamin C can cause can cause flatulence and diarrhea in some animals.


Selenium
Give 1.8 µg per pound body weight daily.

-Caution: Never give more than 200 µg daily
Description: A water soluble vitamin that can be found in citrus fruit, broccoli, peppers, and other vegetables. Vitamin C can be synthesized by most animal species except primates, guinea-pigs, fruit bats and some fish. These animals require it in their diet.

-Action: Vitamin C is important in the manufacture of collagen. It is needed to convert the amino acid proline to hydroxyproline which makes up part of the collagen structure. Collagen is an important component of connective tissue, tendons, cartilage.

-Properties: Acts as an antioxidant and important in collagen metabolism and immune function. Vitamin C works with vitamin E and helps regenerate vitamin E, potentiating its antioxidant effect.

-Uses: It has been used to boost immunity, enhance wound repair, reduce risk of cataracts.

-Cautions: As a water soluble vitamin, any exess vitamin C is lost readily in the urine. Daily supplementation may be warrented in animals under stress or disease, especially in those animals that do not make vitamin C within their bodies. It is important that flavanoids be administered at the same time as supplemental ascorbic acid.

-Side Effects: Excessive doses of vitamin C can cause can cause flatulence and diarrhea in some animals.


Beta Carotene
Give 227 IU per pound body weight daily.

-Description: A water soluble vitamin that can be found in citrus fruit, broccoli, peppers, and other vegetables. Vitamin C can be synthesized by most animal species except primates, guinea-pigs, fruit bats and some fish. These animals require it in their diet.

-Action: Vitamin C is important in the manufacture of collagen. It is needed to convert the amino acid proline to hydroxyproline which makes up part of the collagen structure. Collagen is an important component of connective tissue, tendons, cartilage.

-Properties: Acts as an antioxidant and important in collagen metabolism and immune function. Vitamin C works with vitamin E and helps regenerate vitamin E, potentiating its antioxidant effect.

-Uses: It has been used to boost immunity, enhance wound repair, reduce risk of cataracts.

-Cautions: As a water soluble vitamin, any exess vitamin C is lost readily in the urine. Daily supplementation may be warrented in animals under stress or disease, especially in those animals that do not make vitamin C within their bodies. It is important that flavanoids be administered at the same time as supplemental ascorbic acid.

-Side Effects: Excessive doses of vitamin C can cause can cause flatulence and diarrhea in some animals.


Vitamin B
Give one B50 complex vitamin (high potency) twice daily.

-Description: A group of water soluble vitamins which includes Thiamine, Riboflavin, Niacin, Panthothenic Acid, Pyridoxine, Folic Acid, Biotin and Cobalamin. B complex is a balanced form of vitamin B supplementation.

-Action: B vitamins are cofactors for a number of important biological processes including energy production and carbohydrate metabolism. They are important in maintaining a positive environment for neural regenerative efforts.

-Cautions: B vitamins are water soluble so that any excess is merely eliminated in the urine.

-Deficiency: Thiamin is destroyed by the enzyme thiaminase present in uncooked fish. Thiamin deficiencies can occur in cats fed an all-fish diet rather than a balanced diet. Vitamin B12 is mostly found in animal foods, thus vegetarians may wish to supplement their diet with B12.

Gammalinolenic acid
Give borage oil or evening primrose oil: 500 mg twice daily.

-Description:
Linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid, is changed into gamma-linolenic acid and then into dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA). DGLA is a precursor to the 1 series prostaglandins. The prostaglandins generated from DGLA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are antiinflammatory.

Black currant, borage and evening primrose oils contain gamma-linolenic acid(GLA).

-Actions:
Gamma-linolenic fatty acid acts as a precursor to antiinflammatory products. GLA is an effective anti-inflammatory agent with none of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs. It also promotes healthy growth of skin, hair, and nails. It may be good for skin conditions, arthritis, and autoimmune disorders.

-Administration:
It takes six to eight weeks to see changes after adding GLA to the diet. Small to medium dogs should receive 500 mg of a GLA source daily, either as evening primrose oil, as black currant oil or as borage oil. Large dogs should receive 500 mg of a GLA source twice a day.

-Comments:
Cats cannot convert GLA from linoleic acid because of the absence of delta-5-desaturase activity. They require dietary sources of this essential fatty acid.


Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Give 1000 mg fish oil daily or give 1 tablespoon ground flax seed daily.

-Description:
Linolenic acid is an 18 carbon long polyunsaturated fatty acid with three double bonds. This is an omega-3 oil because it has a double bond at the third carbon.

Linolenic is an essential fatty acid that is converted to eicosapentaenoid acid (EPA). EPA is found in cold-water fish (salmon, mackerel, herring), some vegetable oils (flaxseed, canola).

-Metabolism:
The balance of omega-6 to omega-3 oils is important in prostaglandin metabolism. Linoleic acid, an omega-6 fatty acid, is changed into gamma-linolenic acid and then into dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DHGLA). DHGLA can be converted into arachadonic acid by the enzyme delta-5 desaturase. This enzyme, however, prefers to act on the omega-3 oils. Arachidonic acid is converted into inflammatory compounds (2 series prostaglandins and inflammatory leukotrienes). The final endproducts of linolenic acid metabolism forms less inflammatory products (3 series prostaglandins). Thus by providing linolenic acid in the diet, it is possible to increase the body EPA and reduce inflammation.

-Actions:
Omega-3 fatty acids like EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) are the constituents of fish oils that act as anti-inflammatory agents. These may be useful in an autoimmune disorders or arthritis. Omega-3 fatty acids replace the 2-series fatty acids over time. Thus, cellular stimulation produces 3-series prostaglandins and thromboxanes rather than producing the 2-series thromboxanes which cause inflammation and reduce blood flow.

-Cautions:
These materials will reduce platelet function for a brief period in dogs, but it seems that dogs compensate for this within about 8 weeks.

-Administration:
Available forms: These substances available in health-food stores as products ranging from salmon oil to capsules of concentrated EPA. Eating some cooked salmon or sardines may have benefits over capsular forms of the fish oils. Can also use ground flax seeds, flax oil, or hemp oil as a dietary supplement rather than fish oils.

Recommend giving dogs 1000 mg of fish oil capsules, 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds or 2 sardines every day.


Grape seed extract
Give 0.5 to 0.9 mg standardized extract per pound body wight daily.
(12 to 45 mg daily)

-Description: The plant is a 30 cm high climbing vine with heavily-branched roots, a woody trunk, orbicular leaves, and globular fruit with pear-shaped seeds. It is indigenous to southern Europe and western Asia; however, it is now cultivated in temperate regions around the world. The medicinal parts of the plant include the leaves, fruit, and juice.

-Composition: The grape seed oil contains compounds including essential fatty acids and tocopherols (vitamin E). The grape seed extract contains procyanidins.

-Actions: Acts as a free-radical scavenger. Exerts a dose-dependent antilipoperoxidant activity. Acts as a non-competitive inhibitor of proteolytic enzymes including collagenase, elastase, and hyaluronidase. Provides beneficial effects on the symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency and on ophthalmologic conditions (the resistance to glare, ocular stress, and retinal functionality).

-Uses: Grape seed extract has been used by some people in treatment of various circulatory disorders including varicose veins, hypoxia associated with atherosclerosis, inflammation, and myocardial or cerebral infarction. The grape seed oil has also been used as a source of supplemental essential fatty acids and tocopherols in the diet.

-Contraindications: The tocopherol content of grape seed may increase the effects of warfarin and increase the risk of bleeding when both grape seed extraxt and warfarin are used at the same time.

-Administration: For dogs, give 0.5 to 0.9 mg of standardized extract per pound body weight by mouth daily. Grape seed extract is available as tablets or capsules.


Green Tea extract
Give 1/2 human dose on the label.

-Description: The plant was cultivated in China. It is now grown as a tea plant in India, China, Sri Lanka, Japan, Indonesia, Kenya, Turkey, Pakistan, Malawi, and Argentina.

-Composition: Contains purine alkaloids (caffine, theophylline), triterpene saponins, catechins, caffeic acid derivatives, anorganic ions (fluoride, potassium, aluminum ions), volatile oil.

-Properties: The caffine acts as a Central Nervous System stimulant. Tannins act as an antidiarrheal.

-Uses: Stomach disorders. Vomiting. Diarrhea.

-Contraindications: Those with weakened cardiovascular systems, renal disease, thyroid hyperfunction, or anxiety and those pregnant or nursing should be careful of use.

-Side Effects: No health hazards known with proper administration. Hyperacidity, gastric irritation, reduced appetite, obstipation, or diarrhea can result from intense tea consumption (Addition of milk may help avoid these effects).

-Cautions: Overdosage can lead to restlessness, tremor, elevated reflex excitability, vomiting, abdominal spasm. Fatal poisoning not possible with tea beverages.
-Administration: Drink as a tea.

Siberian Ginseng
Give 1/2 human dose on the label.

-Description:
A 1 to 3 meter high shrub covered in pale, thorny bristles. The medicinal parts are the pulverized root rind, the pulverized root and an alcoholic fluid extract of the rhizome and roots. The plant grows in Siberia, northern China, Korea and Japan. It is a relative of true ginseng, but has entirely different properties.

-Composition:
Contains polysaccharides, triterpene saponins, steroid glycosides, hydroxycoumarins, phenylacrylic acid derivatives, lignans.

-Properties:
Enhanced stress endurance. Increased lymphocyte count. Siberian ginseng has "adaptogenic" properties and reduces physiologic responses to stress.

-Actions:
Siberian ginseng has "adaptogenic" properties and reduces physiologic responses to stress. It increases physical performance and endurance and improves immune function.

-Uses:
A tonic for invigoration and fortification in times of fatigue or during convalescence. Tendency for infection.

-Contraindications:
Do not use in the presence of high blood pressure.

-Side Effects:
None known with proper administration.

-Administration:
Powdered or cut root for teas and aqueous-alcoholic extracts are available for internal use. For dogs, give 1 capsule twice a day.

American Ginseng
Give 1/2 human dose on the label.

-Description: Originally produced in the United States and Canada but also cultivated in China.

Two species of ginseng are available: Oriental ginseng (Panax ginseng) and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolium). Both are full of compounds (ginsenosides) that work on the pituitary-adrenal axis, increasing resistance to stress and affecting metabolism, skin and muscle tone, and hormonal balance. Oriental ginseng is more of a stimulant and can raise blood pressure in some people, so I recommend using only the American species for dogs. Ginseng probably has little to offer young dogs, but may provide an increase in vitality to older one.

-Actions:
Chinese Medicine: Strong action in replenishing Yin and producing fluids. It is weaker than ginseng for tonifing Qi.

-Folk Uses:
Used in Chinese medicine for low-grade chronic fever due to the Yin wasted by Heat in febrile diseases. It also is used to treat chronic cough, exertional asthma, and heaves (tonify the Lung).

-Contraindications:
In Chinese medicine this should not be used in the presence of a Cold Dampness pattern or be used with Veratrum nigrum.

-Administration:
Use 1 capsule of American ginseng once or twice a day in male dogs over 6 years of age.


Miatake Mushroom
Give 1/2 human dose on the label.

-Actions:
Maitake mushroom extract activates NK Killer cells which attack tumor cells and prevent destruction of T-Helper cells. It presents unique macromolecules to the intestinal tract where it alters immune regulation by the intestinal antigen processing systems.

-Properties:
Stimulation of the immune system.

-Cautions:
There is no known toxicity from the mushroom extracts.

-Administration:
Use ¼ the adult human dose for small dogs. Use ½ the human dose for medium dogs. Use the human dose on the label for large dogs.
Ellie
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"Winners aren't born...they're made.And they're made just like anything else...through hard work.That's the price we'll have to pay to achive that goal."
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Postby ellie@ny » August 19th, 2007, 4:18 pm

And about ACV:

The Wonders of Apple Cider Vinegar

"Vinegar" comes from the French "Vinaigre" - "Vin" for wine and "Aigre" for sour, therefore vinegar stands for "the wine that has gone sour." Vinegar was accidentally discovered by French. The fermented wine was exposed to air by accident and vinegar appeared!

Where does the vinegar actually come from, you ask? The sweet apple juice is allowed to age, sealed tightly away from the air. Until all the natural sugar has been converted to alcohol, mother-of-vinegar is then added to start the second fermentation. Meanwhile, it is left open to the air, and, the alcohol changes to apple cider vinegar. Amazing!

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) is golden liquid concentrated with the healthy goodness of apples. It contains more than 30 important nutrients, 12 minerals, over 6 vitamins, essential acids and several enzymes. Moreover, it has a large dose of pectin for a healthy heart, and thus, healthy as a whole.

ACV is cheap, easy to use and it really benefits our health in numerous ways. ACV can benefit both people and their pets. It is antibacterial and anti-fungal and gives the immune system a good boost. As a high potassium electrolyte balancer, it remineralizes the body and helps normalize the blood’s alkaline acid balance.

ACV is proving most beneficial to people or animals with arthritis because it breaks down calcium deposits in the joints while remineralizing the bones. It has proven to be equally beneficial to dogs with hip dysplasia.

ACV is a good remedy for food poisoning and helpful in digestive upsets. It is also effective for urinary tract infections and it lowers high blood pressure. In fact, daily use of ACV eliminates tear stains around the eyes and nose of pets with white or light-colored fur. For those on diuretics, it is helpful in replacing potassium depletion.

ACV is the natural king of skin remedies. It is wonderful for itching and scratching pets as well as a superb skin and hair conditioner. Good old apple cider vinegar either straight or diluted 50/50 with water can be applied directly to the affected area and allowed to dry. It will eliminate dandruff, rejuvenate hair, skin and help sweeten and balance the pH levels in the body. When giving your pet a bath, shampoo, rinse, then apply ACV either straight or diluted, followed by rinsing with water. Notice, any residue shampoo will be washed out and you will feel and see an increased softness and sheen to the coat. It can be followed with a conditioner of your choice. Taken internally will help the body against arthritis, itching, obesity, bad odor, dry skin, joint problems, lack luster hair and weak immune system. Average dosage for a dog or person is 1/2 oz morning and 1/2 oz. evening. A cat is half that dose. Can be diluted fifty fifty with water, dripped on food. Finicky pets try tiny doses then work up to suggested amount.

For centuries, people have recognized ACV's health benefits to fight infection, promote digestion, and even in fighting osteoporosis. So when you eat that salad with the cider vinegar and oil dressing, you’re reaping large health benefits as well as good taste!
Ellie
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Postby Marinepits » August 19th, 2007, 4:26 pm

Great posts, Ellie! I'm making this thread a "sticky"! :D
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Postby amazincc » August 19th, 2007, 4:28 pm

Thanks, Marinepits... I'm sure I'm not the only one who found it all very confusing... :D
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Postby turtle » August 19th, 2007, 11:24 pm

Good topic! Here's something I wrote last year for another forum. I've been using these supplements for a few years now and my dog is doing great.

I feed half raw meaty bones and half Timberwolf kibble, and I find it helps to add some supplements. These are just every day supplements to keep a dog in good health, nothing fancy, but they've worked for me and for many others.

Really, feeding raw is pretty easy, just be flexible and keep it simple!

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Powdered Kelp

It's an excellent vitamin, mineral supplement. It covers everything they need including 22 trace minerals. It helps build up the immune system and helps with thyroid and skin problems. I add about a teaspoon to the food about 4 or 5 times a week. Easiest and cheapest place to buy it is at a health food store, they sell it in bulk and it's $4 a pound locally compared to $12 a pound for "dog" kelp. Try ebay too, for this and others.

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Salmon Oil and Flax Seed Oil

Oils are essential fatty acids. Omega 3's are fish oil (salmon and mackerel are the best), omega 6's are plant oils. They keep the immune system strong, and help keep the skin healthy. They need a ratio of 3 omega 3's to 1 omega 6. A tablespoon 4 or 5 times a week of the salmon oil and a tablespoon a couple times a week of the flax oil and the dogs look great.

Salmon oil is one of the best to add to dog food, it gives them the fatty omega acids they need. Many quality dog foods have salmon oil added but it's even better to add some yourself. Menhaden (herring) fish oil is often processed with ethoxyquin which very toxic and not something you want in your dogs' food. You can also get cold water fish oil, it's pretty much the same as the salmon, tho the salmon is better. Price wise the lowest cost I've found is from KV Vet, and their shipping is free on most items.

Flax Seed Oil is another good supplement, it's an omega 6 fatty acid but the salmon oil is even better since it is animal based and not plant based, and dogs need more of the omega 3s. Wal Mart has bottles of the Flax seed oil for a low price.

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Raw diced garlic

There are many health benefits to raw garlic. It's a natural flea and mosquito repellent, it's good for the circulation, and it's a natural antibiotic. Good stuff! The powdered garlic and garlic pills do not have the same properties that fresh garlic has, so use fresh garlic from the grocery store.

I feed a small clove minced up and mixed in with the kibble about 5 times a week for 3 weeks and then a week off, so that no tolerance is built up. That's for the summers, during the winter when there are less bugs, I only give a diced clove about once a week. Since garlic is a living thing (notice how it will sprout if you leave it too long) it has many beneficial properties which are only in fresh crushed or diced. Those even fade if you let the crushed fresh garlic sit for 45 minutes so it's really best to use fresh and crush or dice it right before you feed it.

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Apple Cider Vinegar

Another useful addition to a dog's diet is apple cider vinegar. Adding some to your dog's food will help maintain the acid/alkaline balance of the digestive tract, and it also helps prevent bladder and urinary tract infections. Dilute it half and half with water and it works well to flush and clean out a dog's ears, it will help clear up ear infections, too. It will also kill yeast in the ears which causes many ear infections. And it can be sprayed on itchy skin and hot spots in this same 50/50 mix, and will help dry up a hot spot and curb allergies. Be sure to get the apple cider vinegar that is organic with the "mother" in it, the others are overly processed and have lost their healing powers.

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Plain Yogurt

Plain yogurt has a lot of health benefits. It helps the dog's digestion and if your dog has been on antibiotics, it will help replenish the beneficial bacteria in the intestines which get killed off by antibiotics. You want to get a plain unflavored yogurt with active cultures.

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Anyone else have more to add? What's worked for you?
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Postby Squid » September 2nd, 2007, 3:28 pm

u kno i always was told that vegetables were good for ya, bu tnever knew that they were that good..... :) im gonna start to incorporate veggies into diamonds diet more often. thankfully this is a sticky now
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Postby ellie@ny » November 3rd, 2007, 8:12 am

About Omega 3,6,9

Omega 3
The most important 2 fatty acids in the Omega 3 family are EPA and DHA as these are in limited supply and only found in any real quantities in oily fish and fish oil supplements. Although DHA is important for pregnant and nursing mothers and for young children for healthy development of the brain and vision, EPA can be considered the most important for everyone else as it is necessary for the efficient functioning of the brain and the body at a cellular level.

The Omega 3's have anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties as well as many other important health benefits. They reduce inflammation and can provide protection against cardiovascular disease, arthritis, skin conditions, depression and other mood-related disorders.
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Omega 6

Although Omega 6 is generally classed as pro-inflammatory, paradoxically, GLA, when sourced dietetically, has anti-inflammatory properties. It can help the bloating and pain associated with PMS. It also maintains healthy skin, hair and nails and generally helps to bring about hormonal and emotional balance.

Omega 3 and Omega 6 interact with each other so the balance between them is crucial for good health. Together they affect the production of hormonal type messengers called eicosanoids, which has an impact on inflammation in the body and all functions at a cellular level.

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Omega 9
Omega 9 also has many preventative qualities as its main component, Oleic acid, helps to reduce the risk of arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Borage oil contains both Omega 6 and Omega 9 in the form of Gamma-linolenic acid and Oleic acid and is in fact, one of the best sources of GLA.

PuraEpa (a human product) is therefore contains a blend of all 3 of the important fatty acids EPA, GLA and OA making it an excellent choice of omega 3 6 9 supplement.

(for pets - Ultra-Oil is a blend of all 3 of these important fatty acids as well.)
Ellie
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Postby jmashaney » December 7th, 2007, 8:24 pm

Wahoo! This is great!

Although it did cause me to clear my entire schedule for the weekend so I can read all this stuff.
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Postby cheekymunkee » December 8th, 2007, 3:10 pm

Don't let it overwhelm you! It is much easier than it sounds.
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Postby LMM » April 18th, 2008, 11:33 am

For those of you who add plain yogurt, how much do you add?
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