Need ringworm advice!!!!

Food, Fitness and how to keep them healthy.

Postby pLaurent » February 24th, 2006, 7:31 pm

Not for a dog - for a cat.

I've been looking for a Siamese kitten and finally found a rescue here with a litter dumped by a BYBer because they are sick with rhino and ringworm. The rhino doesn't bother me, but the ringworm does.

Two of the kittens have large lesions, but one has seemingly recovered and no longer has any lesions.

I would like to adopt this kitten, but am wondering if this is safe for my other animals?

If I bring this kitten home, what would be the best way to safely proceed?
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Postby Maryellen » February 24th, 2006, 8:54 pm

RINGWORM IS CONTAGIOUS TO ANIMALS AND PEOPLE... BE VERY VERY CAREFUL.....
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Postby cheekymunkee » February 24th, 2006, 10:09 pm

I found this link, it sounds like it can be a real pain in the butt!

http://www.sniksnak.com/cathealth/ringworm.html
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Postby CinderDee » February 26th, 2006, 3:50 pm

Any update on the kitten, PL?
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Postby SisMorphine » February 26th, 2006, 4:07 pm

Maryellen wrote:RINGWORM IS CONTAGIOUS TO ANIMALS AND PEOPLE... BE VERY VERY CAREFUL.....

Yup it's zoonotic, a pain in the butt, not always easy to get rid of. I would definately be careful and make sure the kitten really is over the ringworm.
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Postby Miakoda » February 27th, 2006, 12:03 am

SisMorphine wrote:
Maryellen wrote:RINGWORM IS CONTAGIOUS TO ANIMALS AND PEOPLE... BE VERY VERY CAREFUL.....

Yup it's zoonotic, a pain in the butt, not always easy to get rid of. I would definately be careful and make sure the kitten really is over the ringworm.


Oh so true. Myleseb (sp?) shampoo is great & once bathed in it, supposedly they are no longer contagious. But I prefer to trust good ole Mr. Lyme Sulfur.

Also, remember that cats can be carriers of ringworm w/out actually exhibiting any sores. Just a lil FYI. :wink:
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Postby Blitzkrieg Staffords » February 28th, 2006, 10:12 am

:puke: ringworm
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Postby pLaurent » March 1st, 2006, 1:04 pm

Also, remember that cats can be carriers of ringworm w/out actually exhibiting any sores.


I know. :(

So if this kitten tests clear on Saturday and I bring her home, have her re-tested in two weeks and she's still clear, I still not might be safe, right?

I've also read that it's difficult for healthy adult animals, which mine all are, to catch it. Any different opinion on that?
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Postby valliesong » March 1st, 2006, 8:02 pm

cats of all ages can catch ringworm, although it is more common in kittens and cats with immune issues. we had a bout of it at the shelter in one of the cat "colonies" and had to put quite a few to sleep. the others we treated.

if you are treating the cat yourself (although it sounds like you aren't), set him/her up in a dog crate or cat condo somewhere in the house that the other animals do not have access to. wear disposable gloves every time you handle the cat, and a gown or smock, or even complete change of clothing. clean all laundry and other surfaces with bleach, as most disinfectants do not kill the fungus. using a drop cloth beneath the cage will also help catch the fungal spores.

we used lime sulfur dips weekly, and they do smell horrible! it stinks like rotten eggs. i would wait until the cat tests negative, and then do one more dip. after that you should be safe in introducing him/her to other animals. you can also use something called a wood's lamp to check for spores in the coat.

one other thing to watch out for is the possibility of secondary infections in the former ringworm areas. i do not think it is too common, but it did happen to one of the cats we were treating.
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