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Postby Emi » July 25th, 2006, 11:56 am

But don't puppies have soft spots to ?
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Postby mnp13 » July 25th, 2006, 11:58 am

you mean on their skulls? I think all mamals do, it's so the skull will go down the birth canal easier. Right?
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Postby Emi » July 25th, 2006, 1:49 pm

Great thought i was right hehe
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Postby Pitcrew » July 30th, 2006, 6:47 pm

You might find it interesting to know that breeds with unnaturally dome shaped heads, like "applehead" chihuahuas sometimes have soft spots that NEVER close!
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Postby luvmyangels » July 31st, 2006, 11:57 am

When I was a teenager I worked in a pet store and they had gotten a shipment of puppies and one of the puppies had a soft spot that would not close up. I felt so bad for this puppy and I so wanted to take it home but they wouldn't let me. I was all ready to get a helmet for this little guy but they insisted on sending it back to the breeder so that it would be put to sleep. I know it was for the best but that was my first turn off to puppy mills.
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Postby msvette2u » July 31st, 2006, 3:03 pm

If a puppy has a soft spot that won't close, it can be tragic. Sometimes it means hydrocephalus.
When we discovered Hero's soft spot, it was huge, and went from his nose to the base of his skull in the back, he did have hydrocephalus.
When I felt his siblings, at 4weeks old, you couldn't really discern their soft spots (fontanelles) so if you're feeling a soft spot on a puppy it's either very young or there could be a health issue.
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Postby Miakoda » August 1st, 2006, 12:52 am

What y'all are referring to is the open fontanel. In newobrn infants & animals, the bones of the skull are NOT fused, but rather remains open to allow room for brain growth & development (if the skull bones were already fused, brain damage would occur resulting in probable death).

Thanks to horrible breeding, toy & teacup breeds (the Chihuahua is the most common) tend to have problems with the fontanels not closing. Although we typically only notice the anterior fontanel (the one in the front), there are more areas that also remain open. These dogs with this condition tend to suffer from neurologic issues with seizure disorders being the most common. Now...if people would quit breeding these genetic defects...................
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Postby SpiritFngrz » August 1st, 2006, 8:44 am

Miakoda wrote:What y'all are referring to is the open fontanel. In newobrn infants & animals, the bones of the skull are NOT fused, but rather remains open to allow room for brain growth & development (if the skull bones were already fused, brain damage would occur resulting in probable death).

Thanks to horrible breeding, toy & teacup breeds (the Chihuahua is the most common) tend to have problems with the fontanels not closing. Although we typically only notice the anterior fontanel (the one in the front), there are more areas that also remain open. These dogs with this condition tend to suffer from neurologic issues with seizure disorders being the most common. Now...if people would quit breeding these genetic defects...................


Good post!!
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