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Food, Fitness and how to keep them healthy.

Postby GreddyGirl » January 18th, 2006, 5:27 pm

Ugh! I was having a shower and I get out and hear a bunch of banging downstairs. I got down and Greddy has eaten a whole box of Ferero Roches (sp?)

I emidiatly look here and see that I have 2 options to make him puke
I tried the hydrogen peroxide waited 10-15 min and nothing happened (it wasnt fresh). So I run downstairs and grab the salt shaker. Shove a teaspoon down the bastards throat and wait.

5 min later everything he has eaten in the past 2 days comes back up. :yucky:

I'll be keeping a close eye on Greddy for the rest of the day :sad:
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Postby mnp13 » January 18th, 2006, 5:34 pm

yeah, old hydrogen peroxide is basically water.

I'm glad he got everything up. what about all the wrappers?

I'm sure he'll be fine considering how fast you got to him.

You may want to give him some pumpkin or other very fiberous food so that he passes any remaining wrappers/foil

aren't dogs a joy? :rolleyes2:
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Postby GreddyGirl » January 18th, 2006, 5:55 pm

Would a tea spoon of olive oil help with anything left? Trust me the wrappers were there
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Postby cheekymunkee » January 18th, 2006, 5:58 pm

I wouldn;t worry too much, it will all come out "in the end". They have to consume a LOT of milk chocolate for it to be fatal..I *think it is the baking chocolate that is the most dangerous. Munkee & Justice have eaten more chocolate over the years than I can remember. Other than being crazy, they are both alright. :)
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Postby Romanwild » January 18th, 2006, 11:40 pm

That's scary. :shock:

You acted quickly though! :D

I thought Dreyfus swallowed a fish hook once. :shock:
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Postby turtle » January 19th, 2006, 12:45 am

Yes, quick timing is very important. You want to get them to puke as soon as you find out that they've gotten into something.

I've known a couple of dogs who ate their collars and the owners thought the collars would pass thru and did not make the dogs vomit right away. Sadly both dogs died, one from blockage of the collar and the second on the operating table when the vet was trying to remove the collar stuck in the intestines...

Fish hooks, ewww! Years ago one of my dogs got a fish hook thru the side of her nose. That was not fun! But my BF and myself held her down and cut the fish hook and removed it ourselves and she was fine. I'm glad she did not swallow it.
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Postby panda » January 19th, 2006, 1:05 am

wow, I am so glad you heard him and knew what to do. that had to have been scary for the poor little bugger too
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Postby GreddyGirl » January 19th, 2006, 2:25 am

Yeah, he kept looking at me like "Oh dog, what have I done?" lol
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Postby CinderDee » January 19th, 2006, 3:09 am

Poor Greddy. I'm glad you got to him quickly. :)
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Postby Purple » January 19th, 2006, 7:31 am

Greddy being true to form..... :)
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Postby Maryellen » January 19th, 2006, 5:16 pm

greddy obviously has not taken any of rufus's advise and to eat NON edible items.... thank goodness greddy is ok:)
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Postby BullyVW » January 22nd, 2006, 12:38 pm

The good thing is that they're only chocolate coated...so it's not enough to really affect him unless he has a severe allergy.
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Postby GreddyGirl » January 22nd, 2006, 6:11 pm

Yeah, but isnt there chocolate on the inside too, plus there were a few capuchino chocolates too!
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Postby cheekymunkee » January 22nd, 2006, 6:20 pm

GreddyGirl wrote:Yeah, but isnt there chocolate on the inside too, plus there were a few capuchino chocolates too!


there's not enough to hurt them. They'd hsve consume a couple of pounds. although it can still make them sick, it has given Justice the runs

Chocolate toxicity


Q: A veterinarian sent me a e-mail two days ago telling me that my for
dosages Chocolate toxcity were incorrect. Would you please tell me what dosage is acurate.
Thank you. Dr G


A: Dr. G

The LD50 -- dose at which 1/2 of the dogs exposed to a substance will die
--- is about 100mg/kg for chocolate. The dose that causes signs of
toxicity, such as excitement, increased urination, muscle tremors and rapid
heart rate may occur at a lower dosage.

The other problem with dogs eating chocolate is that a lot of formulations
of chocolate are high in fat and dogs often get enteritis or pancreatitis
following ingestion of a lot of milk chocolate.

Your dosages of 44mg theobromine/oz for milk chocolate, 150mg/oz for
semi-sweet chocolate and 390 mg/oz for baking chocolate match the dosages
that I have seen published. Using a dose of 100mg/kg as the toxic dose the
toxic dosages per pound of body weight for dogs work out to be roughly:

1 ounce per pound of body weight (2 ounces per kg of body weight) for milk
chocolate.

1 ounce per 3 pounds of body weight ( 1 ounce per 1.5 kg body weight) for
semi-sweet chocolate

1 ounce per 9 pounds of body weight ( 1 ounce per 4 kg) for baker's chocolate.

So the dosages I am familiar with match what you have included in your
email for death by chocolate. Toxic signs may occur at lower dosages. The
best estimate that I have seen for this is that clinical signs may develop
in some pets with dosages as low as 10% of the LD50 dose.

I have been practicing for 20 years and I do not recall having a patient
die from ingestion of chocolate but I have seen some very excited dogs and
I have seen some dogs that probably would have died from the secondary
enteritis without treatment.

I have talked to veterinarians who feel that they have seen dogs that died
from heart problems, pancreatitis or other complications following
chocolate ingestion even though the dogs ate less than the theoretical
toxic dose.

I think that the chances of causing a toxicity with milk chocolate are very
very low and I don't think it is a big deal if my clients share their M&Ms
with their pets but semi-sweet chocolate morsels and baker's chocolate
should be put where pets and small children aren't likely to find and
ingest them.

I hope this is the information you were looking for.

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Postby Patch O' Pits » January 22nd, 2006, 7:57 pm

I'm glad she is OK
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Postby mnp13 » January 22nd, 2006, 8:22 pm

Not to disagree with Debby but.... :wink:

I'd make them puke before I worried about the amount they ate.
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Postby GreddyGirl » January 22nd, 2006, 8:45 pm

I didnt want to risk it, plus the wrappers and everything :shock:
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Postby turtle » January 23rd, 2006, 1:38 am

mnp13 wrote:Not to disagree with Debby but.... :wink:

I'd make them puke before I worried about the amount they ate.


Yes, I'd do the same rather than worry about a problem later on. A blockage is nothing to fool with and since he ate the wrappers too, that would worry me.

LOL, I made my dog puke the first time I gave her a veal bone! I did not expect her to eat it, I was watching her but turned away for a sec and it was gone. I did not know if she had swallowed it whole or if she had crunched it up. So I made her sick it back up... talk about dirty looks! Turned out she had chewed it well but I just did not want to take a chance...

Glad Greddy is ok!
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