Thoughts on this powder?

Food, Fitness and how to keep them healthy.

Postby CinderDee » May 14th, 2009, 3:19 pm

Parasite Dust for Animals - powder The compound is formulated from Azadirachta indica, Achillea millefolium and diatom flour.

It acts in four ways to rid animals and buildings of flies, fleas, lice, ticks, mites, spiders, beetles, ants and more. The neem tree contains a chemical, azadirachtin. It is an active insecticide, a repellent and a potent-antifeedant and ecdysis inhibitory compound.

Neem herb has found broad use as a wound healing agent and has reported antimicrobial properties. Yarrow is a repellent to many parasites and diatom flour desiccates many arthopods. See product narratives for Wound aid for Animals-yarrow for a more detailed discussion of the medicinal properties of yarrow.

The combination of these processed herbs is a very effective external parasite dust which also presents disinfectant and healing properties to skin infections, lesions and other irritations secondary to infestation.

As of this writing, April 2004, we don’t know how broad the efficacy on parasites may be, nor do we know how long the treatment may last. Also the question of how best to apply the dust is still unanswered in total.

We do have approximately 100 veterinarians field testing the prototype dust. All reports at this time are positive. The dust flat rids mammals of parasites and a teaspoon or two on your window sash or sill eliminates flies, beatles and other bugs in home or office very effectively.

The current manner of application which has yielded success is to sprinkle the dust from head to tail along the spine and brush against the hair to bring the dust into contact with the skin. This should be done under dry conditions. One to two ounces is enough to dust a large herbivore (e.g. a horse). The dust should cover the saddle to midlateral.

The only difficult parasite encountered thus far are engorged ticks. Even engorged ticks have disappeared by the next day post dusting. The ingredients singly are nonmutagenic and nontoxic to mammals, fish and birds. It is expected that in compound they also are harmless in the form and concentration in this product. There have been no adverse events reported to date.

http://www.buckmountainbotanicals.com/pages/product.html
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Postby madremissy » May 14th, 2009, 8:31 pm

:|
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Postby CinderDee » May 14th, 2009, 11:10 pm

lol
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Postby Jenn » May 15th, 2009, 10:16 am

I say give it a try and let us know how it works. ;) :|
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Postby CinderDee » May 15th, 2009, 10:48 am

I don't use anything on Kate. I was just wondering if anyone thought it would be effective. :)
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Postby amazincc » May 15th, 2009, 12:13 pm

CinderDee wrote:
As of this writing, April 2004, we don’t know how broad the efficacy on parasites may be, nor do we know how long the treatment may last. Also the question of how best to apply the dust is still unanswered in total.



Have they updated their findings, by any chance??? :|
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Postby CinderDee » May 15th, 2009, 10:48 pm

Good point, Christine. I didn't see anything more recent. As I said, I don't use anything on Kate, but wondered if others might find it useful.
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