Strange tail lesion?

Food, Fitness and how to keep them healthy.

Postby Marinepits » May 4th, 2006, 1:15 pm

More on ringworm, including photos: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm ... icleid=471
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Postby a-bull » May 4th, 2006, 1:22 pm

Whoa . . . interesting photos! Thanks so much!!! My Mom has an older Rat Terrier that has a leision on his leg that looks like one of those---it never 'looked' like ringworm to me---but it's identical to that dark one on the leg, and he's always chewing at it and it seems to be spreading! I'm going to try an anti-fungal on it and see what gives . . . never thought of it before!

(Oh, he can't go to the vet---he chewed through a rabies pole wire once, and now they're all afraid of him). :rolleyes2:
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Postby Marinepits » May 4th, 2006, 1:25 pm

MAKE SURE YOU WEAR GLOVES! If you are susceptible to getting ringworm, it is extremely contagious! I am not, but my brother is and said it itches like a MoFo.
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Postby Marinepits » May 4th, 2006, 1:26 pm

a-bull wrote:(Oh, he can't go to the vet---he chewed through a rabies pole wire once, and now they're all afraid of him). :rolleyes2:


:backRoll:
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Postby a-bull » May 4th, 2006, 1:26 pm

Yup, had it as a kid on my neck. :o

Weird thing is, her other two dogs have gorgeous coats!!
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Postby Patch O' Pits » May 4th, 2006, 5:08 pm

It may be stud tail and yes it seems females and neutered males can also get it from what I just read when I googled it despite the name
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Postby Marinepits » May 4th, 2006, 5:25 pm

I've never heard of "stud tail", so I googled it, too. Thanks, Patch O Pits! :)

Here's what I found:

Stud tail, otherwise known as canine tail gland hyperplasia, is a relatively common disorder. While the condition
is more common in male, intact dogs, it can affect female dogs (and cats) as well.
All dogs have an oval spot on the top of their tail, about 2-5 centimeters from their tail base, that is different
from the rest of their skin. This area contains simple (single) hair follicles instead of the typical compound
(multiple) hair follicles found on the rest of the body. The skin in this area also contains several very large
sebaceous glands. When the sex hormone levels (androgen levels) in the blood are elevated, these sebaceous
glands become even larger and are referred to as hyperplastic. As they become larger, they produce more and
more secretions which is where the problem typically comes in. These excess secretions can “plug up” the hair
follicles and lead to secondary bacterial infections.
Early tail gland hyperplasia typically goes unnoticed by owners because
the overlying hair hides the defect. However, with time, this area
becomes hairless because of friction and compression of the hair
follicles by the enlarged glands. It is usually at this point that owners
notice an oval, bulging, hairless area on the tail. The associated skin
may be scaly, greasy, darkly pigmented, or any combination of the
above. Advanced cases can take on a nodular appearance due to deep
secondary infection.
Treatment is based on the severity of the condition. Deep bacterial
infections that present as nodules or have crusting or drainage typically
require a minimum of 3-4 weeks of systemic antibiotics. Milder cases
can be managed with frequent cleaning of the affected area with a
shampoo containing benzoyl peroxide (such as OxyDex® shampoo,
DVM) and/or the use of topical antibiotics such as Bactoderm®
(mupirocin, Pfizer).
The key, as with any medical condition, is to talk with your veterinarian and make sure that this is indeed the
correct diagnosis, as many other diseases such as demodicosis, dermatophytosis (ringworm), or hypothyroidism
can mimic the same clinical signs. The good news is that this is strictly a cosmetic defect and does not affect
your dog’s quality of life.


http://www.thebulletnewsletter.com/studtail.html
Last edited by Marinepits on May 4th, 2006, 7:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby a-bull » May 4th, 2006, 6:25 pm

wow, that's interesting---thanks and yet again!!

So I must have inadvertently corrected it with the antibacterial spray . . . cool. :)
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Postby ParisStreetPitCrew » May 4th, 2006, 8:11 pm

Wow, thanks for pulling up that info for me!
The vet said that it is, in fact, Stud Tail. I'd never heard of it before today. He told me to just keep it clean with an antiseptic for now since it isn't bothering her.

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Postby a-bull » May 4th, 2006, 8:12 pm

Get that spray I mentioned above---good stuff. :thumbsup:

Thanks for the update. This was a helpful thread, huh???
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Postby Marinepits » May 4th, 2006, 10:34 pm

Good job, Patch O' Pits! :wink:

I learned something new today!
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Postby ParisStreetPitCrew » May 5th, 2006, 8:00 am

a-bull wrote:Get that spray I mentioned above---good stuff. :thumbsup:

Thanks for the update. This was a helpful thread, huh???


I have the Septi-Clens spray right now.
I feel so bad for her! She hates me right now because I have to spray the hot spot in her armpit AND not I have to spray her tail. She's good at looking pitiful.

Great thread. Thanks for the info.
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