New Puppies

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Postby mnp13 » January 17th, 2009, 11:59 am

blabsforbullies wrote:I do not judge others by the mistakes that they make. We all make them. I form my opinions based on how people HANDLE their mistakes.


Excellent, excellent post.

(though I can't say that I always do the same. :wink: )

oh, and Ruby likes to destroy crates.
Michelle

Inside me is a thin woman trying to get out. I usually shut the bitch up with a martini.
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Postby Colbygirl1984 » January 17th, 2009, 11:16 pm

I am not going to make assumptions here. As I just read threw all of these pages..lol..I think a spay and abort would of been in order. To breed canines, it's about improving the breed. While I want to commend her friend for coming here and being heroic, and repeatdly stating that she will handle the situation fine. My big question aside of why wasn't a spay and abort done (yes, I did see the whole title issue, but if a dog is not breeding material, no offense piss on titles, speuter, speuter!), is she going to make the potential owners of these pups aware of the faulty temperment on one side, and the genetic defect that is being carried on? That's just my two cents.
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Postby mnp13 » January 18th, 2009, 11:30 am

Colbygirl1984 wrote: is she going to make the potential owners of these pups aware of the faulty temperment on one side, and the genetic defect that is being carried on? That's just my two cents.

According to what she said earlier, yes she is going to tell them about the blindness (and I believe her on that one), but she also stated that she will not be placing them altered; so at the end of the day the people who have them can do as they wish. If they decide to "take the risk" and breed them, will they tell their puppy buyers that the dogs have a genetic defect? I kinda doubt it.

A "good outcross" has already been identified - an outcross that will hide the fault - so it's not like breeding is out of the question anyway. The line that was identified does not have a history of blindness, so odds are the trait will just be passed on for a while until it "shows up out of nowhere."

The dogs from the affected litters should have ALL been altered, as should the parents, the minute this popped up. In my opinion, so should any of the dogs from either of the parents. But breeding isn't always in the best interest of the breed :| sometimes it's about money or pride, and the dogs and future owners pay the price.
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Postby Colbygirl1984 » January 19th, 2009, 8:53 pm

I agree, to some people it's about money, pride, and selfish intentions. As if the breed doesn't have enough issues. How sad, true ignorance at it's best. What a shame.
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