Physical problems related to very straight rear legs

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Postby mnp13 » April 10th, 2006, 11:36 am

Ruby is very straight in her back end, and her top line runs uphill.

What are physical problems that are related to a straight back end? What exercise should I do to help offset those problems?

She is going to have her teeth cleaned this week, should I have her x-rayed to check on her hips? How much does a straight back end contribute to hip problems?


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Postby Malli » April 10th, 2006, 12:10 pm

I think swimming is always great low-impact, high muscle building exercise to do? I know it is mentioned when recuperating a dog from ACL surgery, or other injuries that could be re-injured by typical exercise.
Does she like to swim? Do you have somewhere nearby?

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Postby mnp13 » April 10th, 2006, 12:18 pm

She hates swimming. I would have to throw her in to make her do it.

She did jump in out of the boat one time because my sister took her out fishing. She is fine when she goes away from me, but if she sees me on the return she realizes she is not with me and freaks.
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Postby pocketpit » April 10th, 2006, 2:19 pm

ACL injuries are very common with straight stifled dogs. Avoiding exercise where she has to do sudden stops and quick turns would be best to help prevent tears to the ACLs. You've already done the first recommend bit, which is to keep your dog at a proper weight :)
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Postby turtle » April 11th, 2006, 2:16 am

pocketpit wrote:ACL injuries are very common with straight stifled dogs. Avoiding exercise where she has to do sudden stops and quick turns would be best to help prevent tears to the ACLs. You've already done the first recommend bit, which is to keep your dog at a proper weight :)


Yep, that's exactly what I was told too. My dog is also too straight in her rear legs and I worry about the risk of a torn ACL.

Here's an old pic of Fremiet when she was about 10 months old which shows how straight her rear is:

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And here's a pic of her at about 2 years old, she's filled out but is still sooo straight in the stifles:

Image

I do keep her lean and exercised, I think that helps a lot. Too much weight puts a strain on the whole bosy, not just the joints and hips.

If I am going to let her run hard and chase her flirt pole, I make sure to warm her up first. Usually we take an hour walk before I play with the flirt pole, but one probably does not need to do that much, just a minor warm up of some sort so she is more limber and less at risk of hurting herself.
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Postby a-bull » April 12th, 2006, 7:51 am

My guy has the same problem.

My first dog had it, too, and as he aged he developed a wicked swayback. :? Eventually, (at around age 14), his hind legs became weak and he would fall. Didn't stop him, though, but he was a hard one to get near water---and I agree that swimming is probably one of the best, low impact exercises you could do.

I know very little about genetics, but I think it's a genetic defect, so I'm actually not sure how much you can change, other than to strenghten the area to try to prevent injury or deterioration.

Look forward to hearing ideas/suggestions! :)
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Postby rockermom » April 12th, 2006, 8:41 am

Im not sure what you all mean about straight legs? What is normal and what is abnormal?
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Postby Patch O' Pits » April 12th, 2006, 9:30 am

a-bull wrote:My guy has the same problem.

My first dog had it, too, and as he aged he developed a wicked swayback. :? Eventually, (at around age 14), his hind legs became weak and he would fall. Didn't stop him, though, but he was a hard one to get near water---and I agree that swimming is probably one of the best, low impact exercises you could do.

I know very little about genetics, but I think it's a genetic defect, so I'm actually not sure how much you can change, other than to strenghten the area to try to prevent injury or deterioration.

Look forward to hearing ideas/suggestions! :)


That sounds like other genetic problems more so were the issue maybe arthritis HD or degenerative disc troubles were at play as well and not just straight stiffles
Last edited by Patch O' Pits on April 12th, 2006, 1:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Patch O' Pits » April 12th, 2006, 9:32 am

houlabulla? wrote:Im not sure what you all mean about straight legs? What is normal and what is abnormal?

It is the curve or turn in the stiffle which is like the thigh on the rear legs.
This will help you understand it better:
http://www.apbtconformation.com/hindquarters.htm
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Postby a-bull » April 12th, 2006, 11:02 am

Patch O' Pits wrote:
a-bull wrote:My guy has the same problem.

My first dog had it, too, and as he aged he developed a wicked swayback. :? Eventually, (at around age 14), his hind legs became weak and he would fall. Didn't stop him, though, but he was a hard one to get near water---and I agree that swimming is probably one of the best, low impact exercises you could do.

I know very little about genetics, but I think it's a genetic defect, so I'm actually not sure how much you can change, other than to strenghten the area to try to prevent injury or deterioration.

Look forward to hearing ideas/suggestions! :)


That sounds like other genetic probles and maybe arthritis HD or degenerative disc troubles were also at play as not just straight stiffles


Yup, I'd agree with that, given the other symptoms he displayed over the years . . .

I always felt like the stiff legs somehow caused the swayback, though, which I'm sure resulted in disk problems. The arthritis was probably just the result of aging.
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Postby a-bull » April 12th, 2006, 11:03 am

Patch O' Pits wrote:
houlabulla? wrote:Im not sure what you all mean about straight legs? What is normal and what is abnormal?

It is the curve or turn in the stiffle which is like the thigh on the rear legs.
This will help you understand it better:
http://www.apbtconformation.com/hindquarters.htm


Really interesting link. Thanks much. :)
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » April 12th, 2006, 11:08 am

That was a good sight - I'm gonna go home and stare at Inara.
:)
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Postby a-bull » April 12th, 2006, 7:04 pm

lol

We're so anal . . . :D
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Postby bullyboi » April 12th, 2006, 8:12 pm

My girl is very straight in the hind legs.
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » April 12th, 2006, 8:47 pm

Inara's perfect. :| Sorry for you fools! :wink:
Just kidding! Just wanted to yank some chains!
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Postby a-bull » April 12th, 2006, 8:49 pm

pitbullmamaliz wrote:Inara's perfect. :| Sorry for you fools! :wink:
Just kidding! Just wanted to yank some chains!


Oh come on . . . you can yank better than that . . . :D
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Postby pitbullmamaliz » April 12th, 2006, 8:54 pm

But this is a forum I DON'T want to get banned from! :wink:




She is perfect though.
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