Aggression Poll

This is where to talk about Pit Bulls!

Is your dog dog-aggressive?

OMG s/he will kill any dog in sight.
5
10%
Yes, but it's controllable.
25
52%
Nope.
18
38%
 
Total votes : 48

Postby PittieLove » June 17th, 2006, 10:41 pm

My dogs aggersstion has gotten worse since the Duece was given away. He hates all dogs, but doesnt lunge and bark unless they do it to him :oops:
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Postby concreterose » June 18th, 2006, 12:07 am

I chose dog aggressive but controllable. Both of mine are dog aggressive, but know when we are out walking, etc. not to start any crap with other dogs. I don't expect them NOT to be dog aggressive...but I expect them to obey. If I say sit, they better sit, I don't care how fired up they are. If I tell them to come, they better come even if murder is on their minds. For the most part, I have them both where they ignore other dogs if they are behind a fence, or at a safe distance.

They both know that I can be dog aggressive too...they'll have to remove my size eight and a half from their butts if they start any crap with any other dogs :wink:
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Postby SpiritFngrz » June 18th, 2006, 9:46 pm

I'll have to admit I didn't read all the latest responses word for word, but I do agree with what someone said about anthropomorphosizing and expecting there to be peace in the animal kingdom. My dog hates my cat and my cat hates my dog. There's nothing I can do about it. Dogs and cats weren't necessarily meant to be friends. Terriers have some prey aggression- I get that. So I keep them separate because my Siamese will try to fight, but of course she wouldn't win. We love them both and we just deal with it so there are no accidents we would regret.
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Postby mnp13 » June 19th, 2006, 2:16 am

dogcrazyjen wrote:A dog may have a gut panic reaction if it is drowning, but it is unlikely it understands that the result of drowning is death. An infant will struggle if it is drowning, but even at 3 years old a child has no real concept of death. If you have ever tried to explain to a toddler what death is, it is quite obvious they cannot concieve of the idea. The body has very strong chemical reactions when it is in danger which have nothing to do with conscious thought. If you would like I can get out my psychology book and point out what parts of the brain are reacting with what chemicals. It is very interesting how much of our actions are unconscious.


Ok, fine, whatever. Connor knew that going under water repeatedly sucked and was probably panicing... but he kept on trying to get those bouys off of the post. Hold a dog underwater sometime, let me know if the dog "knows" if there is something wrong with it. They don't know that "death" is imminent, but instinctively they do know that being underwater is not exaclty condusive to life.

No, a dog has no concept of "death" but they, like every other mammal, have self preservation instincts. Connor had a choice: A. Breath air and go to shore or B. breath water and get the toy. He chose B. His "need" for the toy outweighed his "need" to breath.

Which is exactly why I think shelter/rescue dogs are all the more appreciative of the people who adopt/"save" them. I firmly believe they really do know.
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I agree and disagree on this one. A dog in a horrible situation (shelter or where ever) will probably bond very deeply with the first person who shows it love, consistancy, stability, etc. Is that the dog being "greatfull"? Maybe, maybe not. We label "emotions" that animals display as we understand them. That dog may see you as a leader and it is a happy follower, if you see that as appreciation it's all good to me.
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Postby dogcrazyjen » June 19th, 2006, 9:44 am

Could he have been trying to climb up on the bouys to get out of the water?

I think that there is little harm in the average person believing their dogs are grateful, I just tend to want to see things for what they are. It is easy for us to put what we want to see or expect to see on the dog, but it is not accurate.

As a trainer, it is not good training to put those emotions on a dog, because it stops me from seeing the reasons behind the behaviors. I could misjudge the reason for separation anxiety, for example, then be unable to work through it due to that poor assessment.
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Postby mnp13 » June 19th, 2006, 11:57 am

dogcrazyjen wrote:Could he have been trying to climb up on the bouys to get out of the water?


No. He had the bouys in his teeth and was tugging on them. His legs were tangled in the rope underwater. When the rope broke he swam back to shore with them still somewhat around his legs. He didn't want to get out of the water - he wanted the bouys.
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Postby Marinepits » June 19th, 2006, 6:51 pm

So, found this on another forum.

http://forums.ibsys.com/viewmessages.cf ... sageorder=

Put on your helmets and your waders, LOL.
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Postby cheekymunkee » June 20th, 2006, 9:40 am

Marinepits wrote:So, found this on another forum.

http://forums.ibsys.com/viewmessages.cf ... sageorder=

Put on your helmets and your waders, LOL.


Why did you show me that??????? I can only deal with so much stupidity.
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Postby Marinepits » June 20th, 2006, 1:25 pm

I did it because I love you, Debby! :backRoll:
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Postby Maryellen » June 20th, 2006, 1:44 pm

i posted that in the bsl news section here..
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Postby a-bull » June 20th, 2006, 2:54 pm

Maryellen wrote:i posted that in the bsl news section here..


I saw it. :wink: Marinepits and Cheeky are a bit slow on the uptake . . . :D
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Postby Maryellen » June 20th, 2006, 2:59 pm

they must have eaten tooo many brownies....its sleepy time...
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Postby cheekymunkee » June 20th, 2006, 3:00 pm

You stay away from my brownies................. :box:
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Postby Marinepits » June 20th, 2006, 3:00 pm

Ahem, I'm still waiting for my brownie! A-bull ate them all.
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Postby a-bull » June 20th, 2006, 3:49 pm

:afro:
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Postby Maryellen » June 20th, 2006, 3:57 pm

:o
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Postby DemoDick » June 21st, 2006, 5:41 pm

SisMorphine wrote:
DemoDick wrote:RE: Dog Aggression
I would say it was normal pit bull behavior, but not exactly normal dog behavior since dogs in general are a pack animal, with the exception of the breeds that we (as humans) have tampered with.


Even wild dogs who live in packs frequently exhibit some aggression to their own kind. That is, after all, how pack order is decided. That's why it is normal. There are examples of every breed that are dog aggressive. It's something that anyone who gets a dog should be prepared to deal with.

Demo Dick

I don't see deciding pack order as aggression. I see it more as social necessity. When I think "dog aggression" I think of a dog who either wants all dogs dead, or who wants certain dogs dead, seemingly based on little to no reason. Irrational Behavior.

Deciding pack order is rational. Correcting other dogs is rational. Wanting a dog dead because it's in your sights is not. I see a HUGE difference there.


That's because you are not the typical dog owner. Most people would look at two dogs mixing it up and have no clue why they are fighting, because they just don't understand behaviors.

My point was that certain behaviors (resource guarding, scrapping for pack order, etc.) are in fact, normal. That's not to say that they should be encouraged, nor do I think that they should simply be tolerated. If people just accepted that these are dogs and not Disney cartoons we would all be better off.

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