You can't keep your pet?

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Postby airwalk » November 2nd, 2011, 10:39 pm

Yep, if he applies, we will tell him that we are unable to approve his application at this time because of his recent surrender for manageable issues. He is welcome to reapply in 90-120 days; however, you and I both know he'll get a dog from somewhere else, I'll just feel better knowing it's not one of mine.

Sis is right, I would dare to say most vets won't euth what they consider a healthy animal.
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Postby TheRedQueen » November 2nd, 2011, 11:02 pm

airwalk wrote:Yep, if he applies, we will tell him that we are unable to approve his application at this time because of his recent surrender for manageable issues. He is welcome to reapply in 90-120 days; however, you and I both know he'll get a dog from somewhere else, I'll just feel better knowing it's not one of mine.

Sis is right, I would dare to say most vets won't euth what they consider a healthy animal.


Yeah I know most vets won't...but I dunno...it just seems awful to give your cat up to the shelter if they truly exhausted everything...and not be there. I wonder if they even asked the vet...ya know?
"I don't have any idea if my dogs respect me or not, but they're greedy and I have their stuff." -- Patty Ruzzo

"Dogs don't want to control people. They want to control their own lives." --John Bradshaw
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Postby fenella » November 3rd, 2011, 7:22 pm

TheRedQueen wrote:He hadn't brought the dog in...he drove off with it. Who knows what will happen next. The trainer part of me wanted to speak up, but I didn't...

There was also a guy that brought in his peeing cat...they told him that it would be PTS immediately, since they can't adopt out a cat with peeing issues. He was teary, but he left the cat. I mean, at least take the cat to the vet for that...not the shelter. *sigh*

Yep, Erin was with me when I picked out Digit...the new female JRT. We both kept shooting each other looks as the people with surrenders came in.
Digit was turned into the shelter originally for being "too much puppy," according to her intake paperwork. She was adopted, but was found and brought into the shelter because of her microchip. They called the man who adopted her to say, "Hey, are you missing someone?" He hadn't even bothered to call to look for her. He said that they could keep her and that he didn't want her back because she chewed everything and liked to run away.
Ummm...it is a JRT puppy! :doh:
I do have an on-topic point...I promise. The biggest issue is not how the shelters are run, but a lack of education on the part of the public about how much work a dog (or cat) really can be. I think most people understand that a dog may be pts if they take it to a shelter, but are in denial that their dog will face that fate because he is so cute/good/etc. It is for this reason that I don't mind the sensationalism of the article. Some people NEED a bit of a wake-up call. Granted, it should be more clear that this is the experience at that shelter, but I think if she made a big deal about that, people would think that their local shelter would be different. The point is for people to think about the consequences of their decision to give up their pet. There are a *few* good reasons to do it, and of course, strays happen...but in the majority of cases, the owner surrender could have been avoided with some solid education before the original adoption/purchase ever happened.
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Postby mnp13 » November 3rd, 2011, 7:55 pm

airwalk wrote:Sis is right, I would dare to say most vets won't euth what they consider a healthy animal.


Which is total bullshit, on par with pharmacists not filing prescriptions for birth control. We own our pets, we can choose when it's in their best interest to be put to sleep, and shouldn't have to justify that to anyone. Could that be abused? Sure. But I'd rather see an owner bring an animal in to be put to sleet than add yet another one to the shelter or rescue population.
Michelle

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Postby airwalk » November 3rd, 2011, 10:22 pm

Oh I agree with you Michelle, but Vets, at private clinics, get to make their own rules whether they are really in the best interest of the animal or not.
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Postby Violet » November 4th, 2011, 4:34 am

Diana..we have had this conversation before..there is a REASON you are my favorite shelter to work with. And I have dealt with MANY. MOST skew their numbers of euthinasias with catch phrases like *adoptable* and several years ago I discovered the fact that some funding was based on euth stats. Meaning, they got more money if they euthed more. Why? because if the numbers are still high, obviously they need more funding to get the numbers down. So basically yeah, some shelters were and possibly still are getting more funding for more death. It's result in some cases was shelters not trying as hard because there were more funds available if they kept killing.

I have been watching you work for a long damn time now. I have watched you systematically nearly do away with euthing in your shelter. You have loyal and devoted employees. And you have loyal and devoted rescues trying to help you. I am certain your shelter is not the only one who can boast these things. but you ARE the only one that I work with that can. Others do ok..but fall terribly short. there is a high turnover of employees. Some of the long timers are bitter and cynical. YOU..you just dig in and work harder.
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Postby airwalk » November 5th, 2011, 12:49 pm

Aww thanks! :) We try hard and I guess to me, it makes no damn sense to be in the business if you aren't going to try hard... :|
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Postby DogsRPeople » February 9th, 2012, 11:03 pm

Hey,

We recently saved 3 kittens off the street, and we gave one to a co-worker. We did'nt want them to suffer through the winter. They were about 4 weeks old at the time according to the vet.

I knew that if we kept them, they would need to be fixed. Plus we already had 2 dogs and 2 cats. I called Lollypop to get an idea. We could have them entered into the Feral cat program and get it done cheap, but they clip their ear, and your required to release them, etc. I asked, "honestly, what are their chances of survival if we just drop them off?" The lady said, "Honestly, we've had more cats turned in this year than average, so I would say no chance!" I said, "Even though they were cute loveable kittens?"

So, needless to say-

First Vet visit for one kitten was just over $100 as she had an eye infection. De-wormed at that time also. We were told next visit would require 3 rabies shots (spread out) due to the age. We asked for a quote on next visit. It was $145. Yikes!

Well, we held off on shots, but they are now almost 6 months old, and we need to get them spayed/neutered. LuLu (Our Now 5yr old Free Cat born in a barn) was $315 at the fairport vet for spaying! Ouch

They are going for their shots this Saturday, and getting a quote on Spay & Neutering.

If only people knew what they were saving by just simply adopting! (Loolypop also Chips)

Robert
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Postby mnp13 » February 10th, 2012, 3:08 pm

"honestly, what are their chances of survival if we just drop them off?"

If they act at all feral and are left at Lollipop they are put down pretty much immediately - according to the people I know who work there.
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Postby DogsRPeople » February 11th, 2012, 8:50 pm

mnp13 wrote:If they act at all feral and are left at Lollipop they are put down pretty much immediately - according to the people I know who work there.


Well, they are extremely people friendly. They sleep next to our Dogs. As for our adult cats- The elder (Sassy) is letting them live here, and the other... (well she don't like anyone) she beats them down, and they submit by laying on their side. lol

As for "acting at all"- hmmm they growl when they have a peice of meat! (very low tone) When my wife makes lunches for work, they will try to take them. One time Lucky (the boy) walked up, bit into the sandwich bag, and tried to walk away while growling! lmao Is that "acting at all" ?

Robert

PS: We have an appointment to get the female spayed, and the male neutered at our vet!
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