"Talking" on the sleeve

Weight pull, Protection, Agility, Flyball... you name it!

Postby dogged » March 7th, 2007, 5:55 pm

Some folks think that a dog that vocalizes a great deal while biting is under stress and/or insecure, others think the dog is being assertive. There may even be other theories, but these are the two I hear most often. Discuss! :D
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Postby DemoDick » March 7th, 2007, 6:56 pm

Depends on the dog. Connor screams like a maniac on the bite sometimes, but he does the same thing on the springpole and has since I got him. Sometimes it is stress (high pitched) and sometimes it is pure joy (low pitched). I don't sweat it too much, but I know people who do.

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Postby GregMK9 » March 7th, 2007, 9:37 pm

I would have to agree with Demo, it all depends on the dog. If the dog is growly, but driving in and countering then I am of the opinion the dog is growling more because of the fight. However, if the dog is growling in the grip, pulling away, backs out of the grip (half grip hanging, on by canines) then I would say this is a nerve issue.
It's not so much the growling in my opinion but the other signs the dog is giving off while growling. Does his growling get louder when there's more stress added? Does he back out, or counter in?
These are questions that you have to evaluate for yourself and answer with an open mind. Most people can't fairly evaluate there own dog, especially when it's a question of nerve. But when nerve issue's are recognized only then can you take the proper steps to train accordingly.
Greg

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Postby DemoDick » March 7th, 2007, 10:03 pm

However, if the dog is growling in the grip, pulling away, backs out of the grip (half grip hanging, on by canines) then I would say this is a nerve issue.


This is the most important thing for me. As long as the dog is piling in I don't worry about it. Some people think a vocal dog is a nervy dog, perod, and there's no changing their minds. They don't care that the dog is doing everything else right. To each his own I guess.

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