what are the steps to train a dog for bitesport

Weight pull, Protection, Agility, Flyball... you name it!

Postby jawstrength101 » January 3rd, 2008, 7:44 pm

i know there has got to be a difference in raising the dog i have a dog that i train for weight pull i have one that is my trick dog (roll over, jump over stuff, ect) i would train a dog to sing a solo if i could. i am interested in the sounds of this the logic behind it cause i like my dogs to know who daddy is and i had a real protective dog about a year and a half ago but she got stole. :x :o
User avatar
jawstrength101
Just Whelped
 
Posts: 6
Location: north carolina

Postby SisMorphine » January 3rd, 2008, 7:55 pm

The very very very first step is to find a trainer who doesn't suck. That is VERY VERY hard. I currently drive 2.5 hours when I want to train even though there are a million different bitework trainers in my area. I didn't trust a single one with my dogs.

You also have to decide what discipline you're looking at.

Different trainers have different ideas on how to raise the perfect dog for bitesport (and you'll find plenty of links on this site if you do a quick search).

And PS: Many dogs trained for bitesport don't transfer it over to real life. A protection dog is a WHOLE other bowl of cereal . . .
Last edited by SisMorphine on January 3rd, 2008, 7:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
SisMorphine
They're like service dogs gone wrong.
 
Posts: 9231

Postby katiek0417 » January 3rd, 2008, 7:56 pm

I would get an experienced trainer to help you if you are going to train for bitesport...I've seen 1 too many dogs not quite make the cut b/c their owners felt they could train the PP or sport on their own...

However, I would start exposing the dog to as many things as possible (different flooring, different sounds). You want the dog to have positive experiences now so it doesn't become nervy later...lay off on correcting the dog for things...if it gets nippy, put it in a crate...don't correct it...

I've seen people correcting dogs for biting them, then later on when they're taught that its okay to bite a person, there's a real conflict...
"Rumor has it, compulsion is evil."

Katrina
Sacha CGC - Dumb Lab
Nisha CGC, PDC, PSA TC, PSA 1 - Crazy Malinois
Drusilla SLUT- Pet
Nemo - Dual-Purpose Narcotics
Cy TC, PSA 1, PSA 2, 2009 PSA Level 3 National Champion
Axo - Psycho Puppy
Rocky - RIP My Baby Boy
User avatar
katiek0417
pointy ear hoarder
 
Posts: 6280
Location: Glen Burnie, MD

Postby LisaM » January 11th, 2008, 7:36 pm

Not only is it tough to find a good trainer but it is tough to find the right dog. The fact is most apbt and other bull breeds just aren't cut out for bite sports. Most are lacking in either prey drive or nerve . You can get by minus the prey drive if good nerve and courage is there, but as far as the bite sports go (Schutzhund, Ring sports, PSA etc) prey drive will defintiely get you to your goals faster. But, as far as an actual personal protection dog you can get by on strictly nerve and courage. Problem is, finding a dog with good nerve and courage on the man is no easy task. Nerve is not something you can "create", the dog either has it or it doesn't. Exposing a sport/pp prospect to various enviornments certainly won't hurt, but it isn't going to make a weak dog confident. Dogs are born with either weak, mediocre or good nerves, and there isn't anything we can do to change that. IMO there is a VERY fine line between "exposing" our dogs to various stimuli and enviornments and "conditioning" them to various stimuli and envrionments. Wiith enough testing, the true character of the dog will be always be exposed no matter how much conditioning has been done by the owner. Put enough stress on a dog and you will see the weak ones fold like an accordian. Not to mention the fact that to have a dog like this (and be succesful) the dog needs to be under CONTROL. MANY MANY dogs look awesome in the bite development stages of bitework, but later on, once control is demanded, these same dogs don't look so good anymore. A good dog needs to be able to take pressure form both ends of the leash.

I don't mean to sound discouraging but please prepare yourself for the possibility your dog won't work out . I have seen many dogs washed out since being involved in a sport club. Have an open mind and understand that this is a very good possibility. Think about all the years the apbt has been bred to NOT bite a human. The odds of finding a suitable dog for this sort of work is very much against you, BUT if you are lucky enough to find a one that is..look out as they can be be very impressive to watch.

Good luck.
A good dog is not that easily ruined.
User avatar
LisaM
Just Whelped
 
Posts: 22
Location: Canada

Postby katiek0417 » January 11th, 2008, 9:21 pm

On January 11 2008, 6:36 PM, LisaM wrote:Not only is it tough to find a good trainer but it is tough to find the right dog. The fact is most apbt and other bull breeds just aren't cut out for bite sports. Most are lacking in either prey drive or nerve . You can get by minus the prey drive if good nerve and courage is there, but as far as the bite sports go (Schutzhund, Ring sports, PSA etc) prey drive will defintiely get you to your goals faster. But, as far as an actual personal protection dog you can get by on strictly nerve and courage. Problem is, finding a dog with good nerve and courage on the man is no easy task. Nerve is not something you can "create", the dog either has it or it doesn't. Exposing a sport/pp prospect to various enviornments certainly won't hurt, but it isn't going to make a weak dog confident. Dogs are born with either weak, mediocre or good nerves, and there isn't anything we can do to change that. IMO there is a VERY fine line between "exposing" our dogs to various stimuli and enviornments and "conditioning" them to various stimuli and envrionments. Wiith enough testing, the true character of the dog will be always be exposed no matter how much conditioning has been done by the owner. Put enough stress on a dog and you will see the weak ones fold like an accordian. Not to mention the fact that to have a dog like this (and be succesful) the dog needs to be under CONTROL. MANY MANY dogs look awesome in the bite development stages of bitework, but later on, once control is demanded, these same dogs don't look so good anymore. A good dog needs to be able to take pressure form both ends of the leash.

I don't mean to sound discouraging but please prepare yourself for the possibility your dog won't work out . I have seen many dogs washed out since being involved in a sport club. Have an open mind and understand that this is a very good possibility. Think about all the years the apbt has been bred to NOT bite a human. The odds of finding a suitable dog for this sort of work is very much against you, BUT if you are lucky enough to find a one that is..look out as they can be be very impressive to watch.

Good luck.


Good post...
"Rumor has it, compulsion is evil."

Katrina
Sacha CGC - Dumb Lab
Nisha CGC, PDC, PSA TC, PSA 1 - Crazy Malinois
Drusilla SLUT- Pet
Nemo - Dual-Purpose Narcotics
Cy TC, PSA 1, PSA 2, 2009 PSA Level 3 National Champion
Axo - Psycho Puppy
Rocky - RIP My Baby Boy
User avatar
katiek0417
pointy ear hoarder
 
Posts: 6280
Location: Glen Burnie, MD


Return to Sports

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot]

cron