CCPDT

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Postby maberi » September 22nd, 2009, 3:13 pm

Certification Council For Professional Dog Trainers http://www.ccpdt.org/

Anyone know anything about it?

PS - No, I'm not looking to become certified
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Postby Malli » September 23rd, 2009, 2:55 am

better then a kick in the pants :|
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Postby mnp13 » September 23rd, 2009, 11:26 am

It's an "online" accreditation that requires no proof of working with dogs. You have to tell them that you have experience, but they only "might" verify that you have. They do require references, but that's it. You take a multiple choice test and you're certified.

It's better than nothing, but it also doesn't say much to people who actually know what goes into actual training.
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Postby maberi » September 23rd, 2009, 11:46 am

mnp13 wrote:It's an "online" accreditation that requires no proof of working with dogs. You have to tell them that you have experience, but they only "might" verify that you have. They do require references, but that's it. You take a multiple choice test and you're certified.

It's better than nothing, but it also doesn't say much to people who actually know what goes into actual training.


Do you feel someone in the training world would apply for this certification to make them more marketable? Paying over $300 every three years isn't cheap

I always found certifications in general to be a bit odd because they often mislead the consumer as to the actual expertise of the individual that is certified. Not to say that someone who is certified in some field doesn't know their stuff, but I've always found the term "Certified Dog Trainer" to be a bit bewildering.
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Postby Malli » September 23rd, 2009, 12:44 pm

yeah, certified dog trainer looks great from the outside world but anyone into dogs soon learns that it means nothing. Certification means you got a certificate from whoever, thats it - but no one gets that, because in almost any other profession it DOES count for something.
I can only please one person per day. Today is not your day, tomorrow doesn't look good either.
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Postby mnp13 » September 23rd, 2009, 12:49 pm

That's exactly it. The person can say "I'm a certified dog trainer" and it automatically gives them credibility to someone who doesn't know better and doesn't know how to check those credentials. And even if they do, when they look at that website and see "300 hours of experience" it looks like a LOT.

From the PetSmart website:
http://training.petsmart.com/accredited ... tors.shtml
PetSmart Accredited Pet Training Instructors
Expertise makes all the difference between getting an okay and an exceptional education. That’s why our PetSmart Accredited Pet Training Instructors complete a rigorous education in problem solving, canine ethology, genetics, behavior and learning theory, with a curriculum developed by both leading trainers and animal behaviorists. By combining these two disciplines, you’re able to first understand why your pet behaves a certain way, and then how you can take that information and teach your pet consistent, healthy behaviors using a combination of verbal cues, hand signals and positive reinforcement.

But I can't find anything about the actual process, though other areas of the site talk about not training using "pain and fear" so, of course, to Joe Pet Owner, it sounds like PetSmart is the best place to go because who wants to hurt and scare their dog?

The problem with credentials and dog training is that there is not a governing body, and it would be very very difficult to create one. Who would oversee it? There are so many different methods of training and different philosophies of what constitutes "good" and "bad" training, let alone what is ethical. One woman in the training club I'm in would ban everything but clickers and treats from the building if she had her way, another instructor puts prongs on 16 week old puppies in her beginner classes. There is no right or wrong answer, so how would anyone ever actually get certified? One trainers "abuse" is another trainers "normal training."

You really can't even go by the titles that a dog has earned because people have others train their dogs, have others handle their dogs, send their dogs out to be trained and titled, buy dogs with titles, etc. Someone with a dog with the alphabet after its name might have not have done one single thing with that dog - but still pass themselves off as a trainer, yet someone who does not have a single title on any dog ever may have trained other people's dogs to dozens of titles.

Really, the only way to know if a trainer is any good is to go and watch them with dogs they have trained or they are currently working with - and not necessarily dogs that they own.
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Postby maberi » September 23rd, 2009, 2:36 pm

And I think it is that confusion and wide spectrum of training styles that make it so difficult for new dog owners to get started on the right foot with their dogs, especially when most casual dog owners don't progress beyond a basic obedience class.

I know I went through many road bumps over the past few years with some coo coo "trainers" and their varying training styles. Even today I still find myself occasionally putting my dogs into situations I shouldn't when entering into new sports.
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Postby Malli » September 24th, 2009, 2:49 pm

I know its how I got suckered in to paying $4000 for a training course, because I would be "certified" :rolleyes2:
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