Stop jumping up on me!!

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Postby ZachMan » May 1st, 2006, 9:30 am

My little girl who is almost 5 mo. old stilll is having issues with her jumping up on me. She just loves to put her front paws up on me when she is excited or just wanting attention. I always yell "Off" and push her off me, but its not working very well. I am getting frustrated and been keeping her in her crate alot because of this and her still not being potty trained perfectly yet.
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Postby katiek0417 » May 1st, 2006, 9:46 am

I, personally, let me dogs jump on me as a reward...but I've taught them that they are only allowed to do it when I invite them.

These are a couple of techniques I used (or have heard about):

1. Put a leash on the dog. Stand in front of the dog, and put your foot on the leash (so it wouldn't allow the dog to jump up). Lean over to pet the dog, if she jumps up, the leash won't allow her to. Praise her for "good off."

2. When the dog jumps up, just bring your knee up....don't kick the dog, just use your knee as a block.

3. When she jumps on you, sweep her back legs out from under her (using your foot). She'll fall...it'll only take once.

I used the third with Sacha. I used the second with Nisha. It wasn't until they were much older that I taught them that they could jump ONLY when they were invited. I taught Sacha that trick when she was 1, and I have just started to teach the puppy (who is just short of 9 mos old). The both get excited when the see me, but stay on the ground (all four legs). When I want to reward them for something, I put my arms out and let them jump up on me...
"Rumor has it, compulsion is evil."

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Postby a-bull » May 1st, 2006, 10:08 am

Just ignore her until she isn't jumping on you. If you walk into a room and she comes running and you know she's getting ready to jump, just turn your back on her and ignore her until she behaves. Try to channel her into a sit instead of a jump, and reward her when she does so. Soon she will hopefully sit to greet people, with the hopes of acquiring a treat, and eventually she'll just do it out of habit.

I've tried the leash bit and it hasn't worked, and I'm not sure sweeping a pups footing away and making it fall is a good plan. Could result in tears or pulls in developing ligaments.

Jumping is a toughie. Good luck!! :)
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Postby msvette2u » May 1st, 2006, 10:09 am

I always did those things, I've also heard "squeeze the paws, not hard, but don't let go" they get tired of it quickly!! They finally don't want to jump up because you've got ahold of their feet and won't let go.

But...I've found a better way to train them is to immediately turn and walk away EACH and every time the dog jumps up. They are standing there going, WTH??
This is because you're actually REWARDING your dog with contact, pushing it off you IS contact. Grabbing feed, whatever, is contact.

So break the contact, walk the other direction, EVERY TIME the dog jumps up, That means that sometimes you're going to LIKE it jumping up and will pet it...if you're using this method, you have to be CONSISTENT. Finally, when the dog DOES just stand there, or when it sits in front of you, that's the time to pet, reward, praise etc.

It DOES work but I've found the younger the dog the quicker it works. That's not to say it won't work with an older dog, I've just found that puppies are easier to train that way :)

All that said, I taught many a dog to sit while being petted by standing on their leashes when petting them so they can't jump up :)
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Postby a-bull » May 1st, 2006, 10:17 am

Yes, and it's easy to instruct visitors to "ignore" the dog if it jumps, rather than trying to teach them how to knee the dog or squeeze it's feet. :)
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Postby katiek0417 » May 1st, 2006, 10:44 am

a-bull wrote:
and I'm not sure sweeping a pups footing away and making it fall is a good plan. Could result in tears or pulls in developing ligaments.



I've watched both of my dogs be tougher on themselves physically (jumping up to get things and falling on their backs, etc)....also I've watched my puppy at 10 weeks old jump up to get the tug during bitework training, miss it, and land flat on her side or back....
"Rumor has it, compulsion is evil."

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Postby dogcrazyjen » May 1st, 2006, 10:46 am

Spend a few days making sure no one else is rewarding the dog for jumping. My husband allows Tess to jump on him, he loves it when he comes home and she is all excited and wants to see him. He will not stop allowing this, so I am just really consistant with my behavior, and she has learned. I simply turned away as soon as her paws came off the ground, and made an ehhh! sound (sharp and loud). Then I turned around and gave her attention when she sat. I also taught her that sitting is the most glorious place, and she is likely to get really good things for sitting. She will now bounce on her front feet when she is excited, but does not jump on me. Although once and a while she will be uber excited and bounce OFF me , since she will need to learn that for frisbee I ignore it. :oops:

It all depends on what you want I guess.
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Postby ZachMan » May 1st, 2006, 10:55 am

Thanks everyone.

She is not rewarded by anyone else for jumping. I've tried pushing her off and holding her by the paws till she tires, but she doesn't care. I also turn my back on her, but she will just dig on my me.

I just get frustrated with her and because she is so different from Frazer.
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Postby rockermom » May 1st, 2006, 11:05 am

I have the jumping problem too. 10mos old and still jumping. It has gotten a little better. But having others in the house who enjoy that greeting it gets tough. Its jumping on others that I dont like. We are working on this in training part 2 is actually this eve. we had someone who the dog likes to jump on or gets all excited. In my case Rocky loves to jump on the trainers they are fun and have good treats. So as they aproach if he sits and sits still he gets a treat. Working on just sitting without moving the feet around tail wag is ok. With each closer step he stays in a sit he gets a treat all the way up till they pet touched his ears examined him the way a vet would. At this point he is getting jackpots for sitting and not jumping. Ive brought this out with me when I know I am going to be around many people and it seems be better when he knows I have a pocket full of treats. Especially if I go out with my training treat bag on. He knows it is work time. I think in just a week of using this he has gotten a bit better. Pushing him off seems to sometimes provoke play. It becomes a game. I am hoping using the treat method he will learn that people prefer to give him attention if he is not jumping on them but being a good dog. I even got complemented at a pet store this weekend when a rep was giving out samples of dog food and busquits. When the man handed me a bag of busquits and Rocky sat there, the man said "wow what a well behaved dog". That felt good.
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Postby msvette2u » May 1st, 2006, 11:08 am

The key is consistency. If you're going to do the ignore/walk away thing, do it EACH and every time. Like children, if they get "fed" or "rewarded" once for a behavior, even if accidental on your part, it all goes backwards...
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Postby Malli » May 1st, 2006, 12:11 pm

I did the knee to the chest, worked like a charm. It took Oscar about 10 trys to get it. New people however, I have him sit for or physically hold his collar or him so he can't jump. He has become much better at meet and greets in the last 2 years... Once they understand off, a leash correction before the paws actually hit you can work too.

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Postby rockermom » May 1st, 2006, 12:16 pm

Yes but holding collar and leash corrections working at first but went backwards and Rocky began disliking being aproached and pet expecially by the trainer that would grab a whole of his collar and give him a shake for jumping. But for some of the dogs it worked well.
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Postby Malli » May 1st, 2006, 12:38 pm

um, there is no shaking involved in my version. I simply hold his flat collar and hold him down, mostly its for people who do not understand that I have to be consistent and tell that its ok he broke his command etc.

Perhaps there was no enough praise in your situation? It seems weird that he would be disliking it, perhaps Rocky is a softer dog and needs a lighter style of correction and a ton of praise??

Os is definately not soft and doesn't let much bother him...

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Postby katiek0417 » May 1st, 2006, 12:42 pm

houlabulla? wrote:Yes but holding collar and leash corrections working at first but went backwards and Rocky began disliking being aproached and pet expecially by the trainer that would grab a whole of his collar and give him a shake for jumping. But for some of the dogs it worked well.


And my version has you STEPPING on the leash. You don't lay your hands on the dog AT ALL. The dog doesn't realize the correction is really coming from you...it's more an act of God to him/her....
"Rumor has it, compulsion is evil."

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Postby rockermom » May 1st, 2006, 12:46 pm

Yeah holding the leash with my foot in a down works well for Rocky when I am out someplace and need him to stay down.
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Postby rockermom » May 1st, 2006, 12:48 pm

Malli wrote:um, there is no shaking involved in my version. I simply hold his flat collar and hold him down, mostly its for people who do not understand that I have to be consistent and tell that its ok he broke his command etc.

Perhaps there was no enough praise in your situation? It seems weird that he would be disliking it, perhaps Rocky is a softer dog and needs a lighter style of correction and a ton of praise??

Os is definately not soft and doesn't let much bother him...

Malli


We are doing a softer style of training now working well. There was very little praise and no treats at all in the old one. He is ok with if I hold his collar flat while letting people pet now. It was just the one incident of shaking and scolding that was going to do him in if we kept it up.
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Postby chance's mom » May 11th, 2006, 9:40 pm

now i know this may sound mean, but i promise it works. i wasnt crazy about it at first but it works! chance was really bad with jumping, he weighs 70lbs and i weigh just over 100. my biggest concern was my bf's nephew who is 2yrs old being knocked down by chance. here is how you stop it....

when he jumps, knee him/her in the chest. it suprises them, kind of wakes them up a bit, but it wont hurt them. just gets their attention. i am not saying hit them with a bat or anything, but knee them in the chest everytime they jump at you and say NO LOUDLY. they will not do it more than 3 times before they get it and stop. but when you say no and do this, walk away from them, then they know they will not get attention. some dogs dont need this much, but if just ignoring them isnt working, try it. chance learned well from positive and negative reinforcement. however, as he got older, he was like a teenager and would test me. he is not scared to jump for a toy, but he knows the difference in jumping for a toy vs jumping on people.
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Postby Hoyden » May 11th, 2006, 11:20 pm

When I had some balance, I used the knee up to keep Petey from jumping on me and he learned really quick. I'd pull a knee up, do an abrupt about face and ignore him completely.

When he stopped jumping up and down like a brindle kangaroo, I'd tell him to sit, then and only then would I pet him and give him loves.

Petey is an attention hound, so the WORST thing I can do to him is to ignore him.


When Birdie came to us, I couldn't do the knee trick, so I would turn my back and ignore her. Didn't work, she'd worm around and try to get in front of me. She was DETERMINED to be pet. She would shove her head under my hand and keep popping up so that I was FORCED to pet her.

I finally resorted to coming in the house with a squirt gun with water only in it (Our neighbors thought it was funny that there was a decorative thing hanging on our front door with squirtguns in it for awhile) and as soon as she lifted her front paws off the ground, I made the EHHH! noise and squirted her. That worked like a charm.

No more jumping dogs with me. But Mark lets them get away with it, and he will get squirted if he lets them jump, which seems to amuse the dogs, kids and our neighbors.

For the first six months we had Birdie, I swear to the gods, I wore a kids pistol holster with a squirt gun in it.

Now Birdie has the most awesome doggie manners :)
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Postby Malli » May 12th, 2006, 2:45 am

we tried the water tactic when Oscar was little and he eventually started drinking it, I think it was one of the biggest f-u's I've ever seen from him, though kind of funny :lol3:

Its great that we have a few tecniques here, as it shows different tools for different dogs :thumbsup:
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Postby dogcrazyjen » May 12th, 2006, 8:35 am

LOL I can imagine the Tombstone-Clint Eastwood music playing, you two facing off, Birdie ready to jump for love, you ready to draw.....


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