Resource Guarding

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Postby Malli » March 31st, 2006, 10:23 pm

I don't think it'd be considered a victory because the item growled over was removed by the "victor" :|
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Postby a-bull » March 31st, 2006, 10:26 pm

Well, if that works for you, good enough---but I know removing an item from a "guarding" dog reinforces the guarding instinct, and retreating from a growling dog reinforces the growling behavior . . . but, like I said, if it works for you and your dog, cool beans. :)
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Postby mnp13 » March 31st, 2006, 10:53 pm

a-bull wrote:If this worked for you, that's pretty cool, but you have to be careful, some dogs would take your retreating after they growl as victory and you could be reinforcing the behavior, (although it doesn't sound like that was the case with your dog).


But you are missing the point. You are leaving WITH the item. They didn't get to keep it. They growl, you go away, but so does the food. You are not leaving them with anything resource to guard. Great, they scared you off, but they are still hungry. You don't run away, that would indicate to the dog that it scared you off. You matter of factly get up and leave as if the growl was a request for you to go away.
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Postby a-bull » March 31st, 2006, 11:14 pm

I get what you're saying, and like I said, if it works for you, that's a good thing.
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Postby mnp13 » March 31st, 2006, 11:16 pm

a-bull wrote:I get what you're saying, and like I said, if it works for you, that's a good thing.


Yup! I just wanted to clarify again...

sorry, bad few days, I need everyone to read my mind :D
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Postby a-bull » March 31st, 2006, 11:52 pm

It's all good---no prob.

I do get that what works for me may not work for others and visa versa.
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Postby rockermom » April 1st, 2006, 1:09 pm

I think a puppy who spent time in a shelter may tend to guard resources. From research I have done resource guarding can be worked out. However I would not want to deal with a severe case. But if you don't keep up with working it and completely stop working it. The dog can start the guarding agian. My pup when he came home from the shelter would scarf down his food when you went near him. Now we can say in the middle of eating. Leave it. and he stops eating because he knows we will give it back.
This is a great article on the subject in the Association of pet dog trainers newsleter. Please read it. http://www.apdt.com/documents/newslette ... 0guarding'
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Postby a-bull » April 1st, 2006, 1:24 pm

I definitely think it can be worked out. I had all sorts of issues, and now I have had none . . . for years . . .

How can I make that article bigger? I'm lame with that stuff, and I can't read it. :oops:
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Postby satanscheerleader » April 1st, 2006, 6:50 pm

I'm sure you can condition a response from a dog for the majority of time but under stress or the wrong circumstances if there is a natural tendancy towards this behaviour, I see it as serious a temperment problem. I guess it is very different when you have kids in the house. There are no margins for error when it comes to temperment for me. It's either rock solid or nothing.
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Postby a-bull » April 1st, 2006, 7:04 pm

I have kids. And it's rock solid. :D
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Postby rockermom » April 1st, 2006, 8:47 pm

a-bull wrote:I definitely think it can be worked out. I had all sorts of issues, and now I have had none . . . for years . . .

How can I make that article bigger? I'm lame with that stuff, and I can't read it. :oops:


At the top of the article there should be a tool bar. See the percentage? put cursor over it and click raising the percentage to readable size.
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Postby rockermom » April 1st, 2006, 8:53 pm

satanscheerleader wrote:I'm sure you can condition a response from a dog for the majority of time but under stress or the wrong circumstances if there is a natural tendancy towards this behaviour, I see it as serious a temperment problem. I guess it is very different when you have kids in the house. There are no margins for error when it comes to temperment for me. It's either rock solid or nothing.


I agree with you especially when it comes to kids. I too have kids 10 and 16 and a pup from shelter who spent important months in shelter. The only guarding issue I have encountered is when he finds something and I am not sure what it is. If it is non edible plastic bottle cap something like that. I can open up and take it out. If it turns out to be something special like gum or candy. He clamps down and I have to pry his mouth open. He breaths heavy and I sure get the message not to take it. I do take it if it is still in the mouth. But still I consider this to be resource guarding which I am working on. I have only noticed this since it has gotten warm and we have been out more exploring. Most of the time whatever it is in his mouth is gone by the time I get to him. Time sharing a kennel with 4 other dogs at the tender age of 13 wks makes him still think he needs to dive for whatever hits the floor before someone else gets it. I guess?
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Postby satanscheerleader » April 1st, 2006, 9:11 pm

Nyx is VERY high drive. She spent the first three years of her life EXTREMELY mishandled. When I got her, if you would try to take a toy from her she would clamp on to it and there was no way you could take it from her. There was no aggression, growling, etc... She just vice gripped on to it. I trained her to "leave it" using a breaking stick to pry her off of it. Once she comprehended the fact that that was what I wanted, her to let go and not to have a tug o war game, she was all good with it. I've never had any issues with her with food, toy, or anything guarding with people. Tanks the same way when in high drive mode but he never shows any aggression or dominance concerning it. It's like his bite and hold instinct kicks in but his intense drive remains focused on the object of his desire and never once is an attempt made to "scare off" the person trying to take it or remove him from the object. The difference between these two and the rest of the dogs is the rest were taught "leave it" from puppyhood so the conditioned response is much more strongly instilled.
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Postby a-bull » April 1st, 2006, 9:17 pm

houlabulla? wrote:
a-bull wrote:I definitely think it can be worked out. I had all sorts of issues, and now I have had none . . . for years . . .

How can I make that article bigger? I'm lame with that stuff, and I can't read it. :oops:


At the top of the article there should be a tool bar. See the percentage? put cursor over it and click raising the percentage to readable size.


Ahh, thanks. :)
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