Two females in the same house???

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do you think two females in the same house is a bad idea

Poll ended at February 22nd, 2006, 5:36 pm

yes
10
77%
no
3
23%
 
Total votes : 13

Postby pitmom2104 » February 17th, 2006, 5:36 pm

I have a question...I have had my bullboxer for about three years now and was wondering would it be a bad idea to get another female? A friend of mine has puppy's that are about a week old now and I want to get one of them but it's a girl. A few people have told me it's a bad idea but I don't see a problem because my Princess isn't a dominant dog at all and has no dog aggression. She has been around puppies before and always treats them like her own baby. What do yall think bad idea? Any input would be great! Thanks
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Postby pitmom2104 » February 17th, 2006, 5:37 pm

I do want to add I read the how to on dog intros but I would like a few opinions!! :)
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Postby mnp13 » February 17th, 2006, 5:39 pm

My opinion is why risk it? The puppy could turn on, and you have a better chance at that pup tolarating another dog if it is of the opposite sex.
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Postby kymn25 » February 17th, 2006, 7:28 pm

I would not. The research I have done on both breeds says Not to. There are many Boxer rescues that will not adopt to a same sex dog household. It must be male/female. I understood the Pit Bull issues but was surprised to see it for Boxers as well.
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Postby Purple » February 17th, 2006, 8:09 pm

I do have two females, one is 9, the other is two, and so far so good, but we watch them, and there is no putting up with BS in this house, no growling, etc. We also have two males in the house as well, one English Bull Terrier, and one old grouchy nine year old miserable, free to anyone Dalmation.
It can be done, but you need to watch, train and monitor....and seperate when not at home!
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Postby Romanwild » February 17th, 2006, 8:39 pm

If they were mute nympho maniacs that owned a liquor store it would work really well for me! :devilWink:

Oh.....you mean pit bulls. Sorry! :oops:
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Postby pitmom2104 » February 17th, 2006, 9:03 pm

We definately plan on watching them and keeping them separated when we aren't home we have crates my Princess is a counter surfer when we leave her out for too long!!
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Postby Purple » February 17th, 2006, 9:05 pm

Hopscotch was six months old when we introduced her to Purple, who would've been sevenish at the time....
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Postby mnp13 » February 18th, 2006, 12:06 am

pitmom2104 wrote:We definately plan on watching them and keeping them separated when we aren't home we have crates my Princess is a counter surfer when we leave her out for too long!!


But are you willing to do perminent crate-n-rotate if one or both become aggressive? There is a higher risk of that with two of the same sex.
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Postby satanscheerleader » February 18th, 2006, 5:32 am

I didn't vote because my true answer would be that it depends on the owner. I have four females of my own and five female fosters and do fine but unless you are a total control freak with your dogs like myself, your chances of a more compatable relationship would be better with a male/female pair. :|
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Postby embers » February 19th, 2006, 2:26 pm

How old is your current dog? How often has she been exposed to adult female dogs, particularly Pit Bulls? Just because she enjoys puppies does not mean that she will tolerate an adult female Pit Bull in the home. Even if she can be managed, you need to consider her comforts, as well... You have responsibility to your current dog, and the second you bring a new dog home, you have the same responsibility to that dog, as well. A crate-and-rotate can be managable and approprate as a forever solution to dog aggression, but it would be almost irresponsible to enforce that on your current dog (that is used to having you all the time) and the new dog if you are aware of ways to avoid this possible reality before bringing dog #2 home.

Possible ways to avoid the forever seperation and rigerous uncomfortable management:

Do not get a second dog.
Do not get a puppy - alrered dogs over the age of 2 will have a better defined reaction to other dogs, while your puppy may develope this later in your home, and it may include wanting to eat the current dog.
Getting an adult dog from shelter or rescue may help you make a choice on which dog excells and enjoys other dogs, and you can interact your dog with the chosen dog before the dog comes home
Get a different breed/mix - there are other breeds that have a better predisposition for getting along with other dogs. If you get another bully, The chances for dog aggression is present not only in the new dog, but also in your current dog. Getting an adult dog of a different breed may help decrease the chances of serious dog aggression developing in the home.
GET AN ALTERED DOG OF THE OPPOSITE SEX - applies to all of the above suggestions.

A Pit Bull puppy may not develope dog aggression until well into their mature adult life (I have seen spayed females that were zero dog aggressive -lets-go-to-the-dog-park types turn on strong even after 3 years). Additionally, it is within very realistic possibility that either dog may not become dog aggressive, but could at any point, without any play elevation, warning, or reason react to eachother or have a serious fight. This can happen with any Pit Bull type dog and another dog, but the chances are increased dangerously with same-sex pairing.

I want to dispell one misunderstanding right now - with Pit Bulls the "if they are raised together they will get along" idea is totally incorrect.

I have managed multiple Pit Bulls and mixes. I have managed them altered and intact. I have had peace and fun, and I have also experienced SERIOUS fights in very controlled conditions. I would not suggest multiple dog ownership to most people with a Pit Bull type dog. I know that it sounds very conservative, but I have seen that Pit Bull type dogs are obsessed with people, but do not interact with other dogs like most breeds and mixes do. Pit Bulls that even love to play with other dogs can fight with another dog in the household, or become stressed at their presence and react in other ways (behavior, health, etc).

Multiple dog homes with Pit Bulls are a constant effort in management. Play is managed differently, often toys cannot be shared and excitement level has to stay low, there is no such thing as "letting them work it out", and food can become lethal. The best part.... this can all happen suddenly after years of no issues, so your gard will be down and you will be shocked, trumatized, and scared... and sometimes owners never feel the same about the dogs afterwards and elect to rehome or dump the whitnessed aggressor.

Pit Bulls can live in multiple dog homes, obviously, but the whole household has to adop a new and often uncomfortable system for living. This is part of responsible pet ownership with Pit Bulls, a contributing reason for why there is the homeless problem and the "they are savage" misunderstanding, and why this breed is not approprate for everyone.

These are considerations to be taken seriously when adding any dog of any sex, age, or breed into a home with a Pit Bull. Now - bringing home another Pit Bull, one that is not yet mature, and of the same sex... boy howdy! You are really playing with fire!

I have two females and two males. The females are Pit Bulls, and one of the males is an amstaff. The females LOVE each other. They are attached at the hip. They would likely kill eachother over breakfast. Every so often, they try to just randomly, meaning we have breaksticks and a system for avoiding fights and breaking them up quickly. They get along beautifully 90% of the time, but the other 10% is two Pit Bulls trying to fight to the death. After a fight is broken up - they are instandly best friends again. One dog is almost three. The other is between 8 and 12. Both are spayed. Neither are what I would consider dog aggressive or reactive.

This is well with in normal for this breed.

My male amstaff loves all other dogs.... with the exception of one dog every so often, and he wants to eat them. Totally random. He is also a spaz with toys, and can start a fight with the other two bullies just over elevated energy if not managed. If there is a fight, he is very willing to jump right in, tail wagging. All a game. This is also very normal for the breed.

My suggestion: wait. Look into as much information as you can, pass on this litter, and make a plan and an active choice about adding dog number two. Dog number two will be an altered male - preferably adult, but if you are ready for the responsibility, puppy. Find a local Pit Bull rescue that is willing to let you meet several male dogs, and interact them with your current dog. Maybe try fostering first, to see how both do inside the home togehter, as well. Really put consideration into this, as it is a forever commitment.

Two Pit Bulls of the same sex can work out beautifully. I would never suggest it to anyone.
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Postby Romanwild » February 19th, 2006, 5:00 pm

I have two pit bulls and I try to make sure I am always aware of what's going on. Even though Dreyfus is top dog I don't trust that either of them will back down in a given situation.

Early on I found out the toy box is to be put away. I will give them each a toy and watch them when they do play. 99% of the time Diamond will instantly give up what she has when Dreyfus just looks at her. Once in a while she will growl back. I instantly pick up the toy and put it away.

Dinner time is always seperated. Diamond in the crate and Dreyfus off to the side so they can't see each other. I am always close by.

They're never going to be guarnatees with this type of dog. You should always worry and try to be preventative regardless of sex, age, or reproductive status. :|

I thought this was interesting.

http://www.clickersolutions.com/articles/2001/hierarchies.htm
Social Hierarchies

As part of Dr. Beach's long-term study of the behavioral endocrinology of sexually differentiated behaviors in dogs, (conducted at the University of California, Berkeley), we investigated sex differences in social rank and aggressiveness*. The findings proved to be so rewarding, that observational experiments on the development of social hierarchies became the focus of the research program for nearly a decade.

Social rank was assigned primarily from results of dyadic bone tests - observations of two dogs with one bone, and from general observations of the pack at large, e.g., which dogs had prime access to other valued and limited commodities such as, favorite resting places, food pans, water supply, toys etc. Standard dyadic bone tests comprised two parts: firstly, the equal opportunity test, in which the bone (a large meaty ox tail) was thrown to land equidistant between the two dogs and then, the ensuing interactions were observed for 90 seconds (e.g., possession, approach, vocalizations, threats etc.); and secondly, the affirmative action test, wherein the bone was given to the underdog for 30 seconds and then the higher ranking individual was released from an holding cage and the interactions were observed for a further 90 seconds.
Established Hierarchies

Male-Male Dyads

An examination of inter-male relationships demonstrated an absolutely linear hierarchy, with extremely infrequent variation during the nearly ten years of testing. Regardless of the specific situation, ownership of a bone, or any valued commodity, was almost always predecided by the rank of the dogs concerned.

Female-Female Dyads

Females had a similar linear hierarchy but compared with males, they exhibited greater variation from day to day. Female success was often dependent on the specific situation. For example, if both females had equal opportunity to take possession of the bone, its ownership was decided primarily by rank. However, if one bitch had already established possession, it was not uncommon for her to successfully defend the bone against higher ranking females (and sometimes, against higher-ranking males). It appeared, 'possession' was nine-tenths of female law.

Male-Female Dyads

In view of their greater size and strength, it was not surprising to find, males were generally higher ranking than females and won nearly 80% of the tests. Even so, some females were very high ranking and in some groups, the top dog was female.
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Postby SisMorphine » February 19th, 2006, 5:59 pm

Personally I am more likely to trust 10 male dogs in a home more than 2 female dogs in a home . . . of any breed. Any girl will tell you, we're catty and bitchy. It doesn't mean it's any different just because we're talking about dogs and not people.
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Postby Romanwild » February 19th, 2006, 6:18 pm

That's what that study essentially says but I didn't want to point out the parralells! :lookaround:
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Postby satanscheerleader » February 19th, 2006, 6:44 pm

Where in my case, I do fine controlling a houseful of females but literally could not add a male without Tank wanting to kill it. I guess I'm just the bitchiest. :| :D
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Postby Romanwild » February 19th, 2006, 6:49 pm

:ROFL2:
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Postby SisMorphine » February 19th, 2006, 8:48 pm

Romanwild wrote:That's what that study essentially says but I didn't want to point out the parralells! :lookaround:
:ROFL2:
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Postby SpiritFngrz » February 19th, 2006, 9:12 pm

It depends on the dogs...but to be safe, I say I probably won't do it. Satin plays well with a female that belongs to friends of ours. Usually they play very well but sometimes it can get escalated. If we ever get another dog it will probably be a male that will let her be the dominant one.
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Postby Patch O' Pits » February 20th, 2006, 9:25 am

SisMorphine wrote:Personally I am more likely to trust 10 male dogs in a home more than 2 female dogs in a home . . . of any breed. Any girl will tell you, we're catty and bitchy. It doesn't mean it's any different just because we're talking about dogs and not people.
LOL I agree.

That being said it really does depend on the indivual dogs and the owner no matter what the sex the dogs are.
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Postby concreterose » February 22nd, 2006, 7:37 pm

I am of the mind that it depends on the owner. I prefer bitches, and had three at one time. I did wait until my oldest was about seven to add another dog to the mix. I never had any problems out of them, and my youngest is dog aggressive towards other bitches, but has no problems with her pack. I am very diligent about seperating when eating, seperation w/out supervision (though I did leave Pookie and Daphne loose together for almost four years w/no problems, Vicki was crated or on another floor of the house) and personal space when eating bones or treats. I find that as long as you assume a leadership role and the pack knows that you aren't buying any crap, you tend to have less issues. Plus Pookie was true alpha over the other dogs, very calm, quiet and self assured. They never even thought about challenging her. If I decide to get another dog from a rescue, I am sure I will probably be encouraged to get a male, so I am considering going through a breeder when I decide to add to my household again if I decide that I want another female. I would NOT recommend same sex pairings for novice owners, or individuals that are new to bull breeds.
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