Cancer forces 5 year old GSD to find new home

Postby SisMorphine » July 9th, 2008, 1:38 pm

I just got the saddest phone call :(

An elderly couple, 88 and 85 years old, need to rehome their 5 year old female GSD. They recently found out that the male owner has cancer, and the female does not think she can take care of her husband and the dog.

Shiela is a 5 year old GSD (possible mix, owner says)
Female
Spayed
UTD
Good with dogs
Loves kids
Crate trained
Gentle
Energetic but overweight
Never been tested with cats


This dog sounds like a DREAM for any family. She is coming in to be groomed on Monday and I'm going to temperament test her while she's here and get some pics. If ANYONE can help out this poor woman it would be greatly appreciated. The dog just sounds superb :(
"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves; we must die to one life before we can enter another." -Anatole France
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Postby gayrghts » July 9th, 2008, 1:42 pm

gosh woudlnt it be better to try to find support's for the woman..... so she could keep the dog....

is it financial, or physical or??
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Postby SisMorphine » July 9th, 2008, 2:05 pm

Phyical, not financial hardship. The woman is friggin' 85 years old if she has been over all of her options (which she has) and thinks that rehoming is the best idea then I'm in no way going to try to change her mind.
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Postby Marinepits » July 9th, 2008, 2:10 pm

I'll keep my ears open for the pup. Can't wait to see pics! :)
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Postby KJS » July 9th, 2008, 2:12 pm

I just wondered if thy had possibly considered paying a local teen to walk the dog twice a day :? ...it seems too sad for words that she will probably give up her dog...and the man will feel bad...and then he will probably pass on...and she wont even have a dog for company...it godawful thats what it is...

everyone pray for someone close to them to take poor Sheila so she can at least vivit....
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Postby gayrghts » July 9th, 2008, 6:41 pm

That's what i was thinking, or even some church groups are willing to take over the physical care of it.... just like groups often are there to help with a pet when someone has AIDS....

because in no time this woman may be all alone.
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Postby SisMorphine » July 9th, 2008, 8:57 pm

THE WOMAN WANTS TO REHOME HER DOG.

So let's keep this on topic of finding this dog a new place to live because nothing would make this woman HAPPIER than to know that her husband's dog is someplace where she can get the proper love, exercise, and attention.

Thank you.
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Postby BritneyP » July 9th, 2008, 9:04 pm

Personally, it sounds like rehoming would be the dog's best option.

I appreciate the fact that this woman isn't a complete moron and has the dog's best interests at heart, instead of just completely forgetting about her while caring for her sick husband.

At 5 years old, the dog could find a GREAT family and get settled in just fine there and spend the rest of her life happy and healthy. The woman is 85 years old, in no time she might be all alone, but then in no time after that the dog might be all alone, and land in a shelter. How fair is that? :|
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Postby SisMorphine » July 14th, 2008, 3:10 pm

Well the dog nailed my boss' brother for sticking his hand in the crate to put her leash on. So I will not be helping to find this dog a home.

The funny thing is the woman is PISSED AT US for her dog sending one of our staff to the hospital.
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Postby mnp13 » July 14th, 2008, 3:14 pm

Huh? she's mad at you??!?!

Outside of that, re-homing sounds like a good idea, not a bad one. the odds of them remaining "independant" after this type of illness, and his possible death because of it, are pretty slim. It would seem that she is thinking of the best for the dog.
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Postby airwalk » July 14th, 2008, 3:42 pm

SisMorphine wrote:Well the dog nailed my boss' brother for sticking his hand in the crate to put her leash on. So I will not be helping to find this dog a home.

The funny thing is the woman is PISSED AT US for her dog sending one of our staff to the hospital.


So did the dog know the person that stuck his hand into the crate? Seems that might have not been the best way to get the dog?
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Postby BritneyP » July 14th, 2008, 3:44 pm

airwalk wrote:
So did the dog know the person that stuck his hand into the crate? Seems that might have not been the best way to get the dog?


I'm going to have to tend to agree here, but purely by speculation. Although, wasn't it the first time the dog had ever been there?
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Postby SisMorphine » July 14th, 2008, 3:47 pm

airwalk wrote:
SisMorphine wrote:Well the dog nailed my boss' brother for sticking his hand in the crate to put her leash on. So I will not be helping to find this dog a home.

The funny thing is the woman is PISSED AT US for her dog sending one of our staff to the hospital.


So did the dog know the person that stuck his hand into the crate? Seems that might have not been the best way to get the dog?

It may not have been the best way to get the dog, I dunno, I wasn't here when it happened, but I'm not going to put my name up with a dog who bit out of fear.

If this was a dog who was here for training with these issues I would be looking at this from my trainer's eye and helping the family deal with this problem, but looking at the dog from a rescue stand point it's a no.
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Postby airwalk » July 14th, 2008, 5:06 pm

I don't necessarily disagree about not putting your name on it for rescue...it would take just the right home and would have to be one that understands GSD's and their needs.

I just always am surprised when someone will reach into a crate or car or something like that with a strange dog and not expect to get bit. Back a dog into a corner with no where to go, make them feel threatened and I'm not sure what other reaction should be expected.
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Postby SisMorphine » July 14th, 2008, 5:21 pm

airwalk wrote:I just always am surprised when someone will reach into a crate or car or something like that with a strange dog and not expect to get bit. Back a dog into a corner with no where to go, make them feel threatened and I'm not sure what other reaction should be expected.

I think I would have been less worried if the dog was at the far back of the crate and the guy was bit shoving himself in there to crawl after her. It is my understanding that she was at the front of the crate, but Liisa can clarify this.

To me she had a bit more flight to attempt before needing to opt for fight. When I temperament test a dog for rescue I put pressure on them in a few different situations to see if their fight is going to come out (often including a dog's reactions in a crate). She also had many other options, including growling or showing her teeth, prior to opting to bite. She was fearful enough to the point of biting as a first resort instead of a last in a situation that shouldn't have put that much pressure on her.

Is this a bad dog? Nope. It's a dog who the owner admitted hasn't been out of the house except to go to the vet's and get groomed once or twice before, and who the owner also admits is fearful, but did not tell us until after the bite occurred. That's something you kinda want to know beforehand ;)
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Postby airwalk » July 14th, 2008, 5:22 pm

Ah yep that would be some very important information...undersocialized and sounds like undertrained...very important teeny facts.
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Postby amazincc » July 14th, 2008, 5:25 pm

So... what's gonna happen to her now?
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Postby Mickle » July 14th, 2008, 5:36 pm

She wasnt all the way in the back of the crate and earlier I was practically in the crate with her to take the lead off of her after she had her bath. When I was in the crate face to face with her I didnt have a problem or I wouldnt have let him go get her out for me. She was fearfull outside of the crate and in the tub but didnt growl or even give me a funny look. The bite came out of nowhere with no visible warning signs. After the fact however she definatly had the dont mess with me look going on.
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Postby airwalk » July 14th, 2008, 5:48 pm

I'm not excusing the bite...but could she have simply reached her stress limits, especially if she's undersocialized?
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Postby SisMorphine » July 14th, 2008, 5:54 pm

amazincc wrote:So... what's gonna happen to her now?

I don't know. I tried to talk to the woman more about her options but she was pissed off.

Frankly I don't blame her or the dog. She's going through some horrible stuff right now and I'm sure with the chaos at home without the male owner there (and this dog being HIS dog), everything is just very overwhelming. I truly hope that once she can sit down and look at things a little better she will give me a call back so I can help her figure out her options.
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